[QODLink]
Africa
Archbishop Tutu wins $1m for 'speaking truth'
Anti-apartheid hero is awarded cash prize by UK-based foundation for being strong "voice for justice and freedom".
Last Modified: 05 Oct 2012 09:44
Tutu has recently called for the prosecution of Tony Blair and George Bush for their role in invading Iraq [EPA]

A foundation promoting good governance in Africa says it will give anti-apartheid hero Archbishop Desmond Tutu of South Africa a $1m award for "speaking truth to power".

The London-based Mo Ibrahim Foundation announced the one-off award on Thursday, saying Tutu "is and has throughout his life been one of Africa's great voices for justice, freedom, democracy and responsible, responsive government".

A Nobel peace laureate, Tutu was an anti-apartheid leader during the most desperate years of the struggle against racist rule and has continued to be outspoken on world events.

He has been particularly critical of Israel's treatment of Palestinians and China's treatment of Tibetans.

Last month Tutu caused a stir, calling for Tony Blair, Britain's former prime minister, and former US president George W Bush to face trial in The Hague for their role in the Iraq war.

Writing in the Observer newspaper, Tutu, who turned down an invitation to attend a conference in South Africa where Blair was the main speaker, accused the two men of lying about weapons of mass destruction.

He said the invasion left the world more destabilised and divided "than any other conflict in history".

The foundation, founded by Sudanese-born Mo Ibrahim, also gives an annual $5m prize for good governance in Africa, awarded to a former head of state.

Recent recipients of the award include former presidents Festus Mogae, Joachim Chissano and Pedro Verona of Botswana, Mozambique and Cape Verde respectively.

236

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.