[QODLink]
Africa
Tunisia reveals date for 2013 elections
Presidential and parliamentary polls to be held in June, after widespread criticism of ruling coalition's hold on power.
Last Modified: 14 Oct 2012 06:37
Tunisian activists have become increasingly critical of the ruling coalition in recent months [EPA]

Tunisia's ruling coalition, led by the Islamist Ennahdha movement, has said it had agreed to hold presidential and parliamentary elections on June 23 with the president being chosen directly by voters.

The coalition's agreement early on Sunday on a date for elections and the establishment of an amended parliamentary system come after widespread criticism from the opposition that Ennahdha wants to control the government and avoid elections.

The Ennahdha movement won the country's first free elections last October following the Tunisia's revolution, which set off last year's "Arab Spring" uprisings. The movement heads a government that also includes two secular parties, the Congress for the Republic and the Ettakatol.

The ruling coalition said in a statement that an agreement had been reached setting "June 23, 2013, as the date for legislative and presidential elections," with a presidential runoff scheduled for July 7.

"We agreed on the choice of a mixed political system where the election of the president of the republic will be directly by the people ... The political system will ensure a balance between authorities and in the executive authorities," the statement said.

The agreement must be approved by the Constituent Assembly, where the ruling coalition has a majority of the 217 seats.

The agreement will help speed the drafting of a constitution. The form of political system was a big contrast between Ennahdha, which called for the parliamentary system, and the rest of the parties, which called for a dual political system.

The amended parliamentary system will have powers balanced by between the parliament and the president.

The announcement of a date for elections may dispel doubts of Tunisia's partners in the West and foreign investors who wish to enter the Tunisian market.

The Constituent Assembly elected Moncef Marzouki president in December 2011 to follow Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, who was ousted as president in January 2011 after weeks of protests. Those protests inspired a wave of uprisings that
spread across the Middle East and North Africa.

331

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.