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Libya on the Line: The war retold

Al Jazeera will retell the Libyan civil war from a new perspective: through the eyes of Gaddafi and other top officials.

Last Modified: 18 Aug 2013 08:40
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They're the conversations Muammar Gaddafi didn't want the world to hear: Al Jazeera's Hoda Hamid obtained more than 12,000 recordings of Gaddafi, his son Saif al-Islam, and other high-ranking Libyan officials.

Libya on the Line will retell the story of last year's Libyan civil war from a new perspective: through the eyes of the Libyan officials fighting desperately to stay in power.

We've posted a taste of the recordings below. In one conversation, Saif al-Islam Gaddafi tells an aide he will 'send people to liquidate' rebel fighters. It's a statement that Luis Moreno Ocampo, the chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Court, describes as a "kill order." In another, Muammar Gaddafi and that same aide - Tayeb El Safi - reminisce about how they met, decades ago.

The first installment of Libya on the Line will be released, on TV and online, on Friday, May 11, at 1700 GMT, with repeats on Al Jazeera on Saturday, Sunday, Monday and Tuesday (May 12-15).

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Al Jazeera
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