[QODLink]
Africa
Ugandan police detain opposition leader
Police arrest Kizza Besigye for "disturbing traffic" while he was on his way to join protests against high food prices.
Last Modified: 31 Oct 2011 20:12
Uganda opposition leader Kizza Besigye, third left, and his supporters were blocked on their way to protests [Reuters]

Ugandan police have arrested opposition leader Kizza Besigye for the second time in a month, as he was leaving his house to join a protest against soaring food and fuel prices, his party has said.

Anne Mugisha, a senior official at Besigye's Forum for Democratic Change, said his exact place of detention was unclear after being moved from different police stations.

"Besigye ... was taken in a police vehicle and his driver chased them but he lost them as they entered a police barracks," Mugisha said.

"Up to now we don't know where he is and we're calling it an abduction."

Judith Nabakooba, a police spokeswoman, said Besigye was taken to the criminal investigations department of the police headquarters in nearby Kampala, Uganda's capital.

Nabakooba said that Besigye was walking along the road with more than 20 people and was thus disturbing traffic.

"He walked with over 20 people including journalists from his home," she said.

"Police stopped him when he was on the road and advised him not to walk with such a big number of people on the road because it disturbs traffic but Besigye insisted that he had to walk to wherever he wanted."

The authorities had briefly detained Besigye, a one-time presidential contender, earlier this month when he joined a 'walk-to-work' protest on the outskirts of the capital, Kampala.

Deadly protests in April and May over high food and fuel prices were crushed by President Yoweri Museveni, who has been in power for more than two decades, and who blames the high costs on outside pressures.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Featured
Pro-Russia leaders' election in Ukraine's east shows bloody conflict is far from a peaceful resolution.
Critics challenge Canberra's move to refuse visas for West Africans in Ebola-besieged countries.
A key issue for Hispanics is the estimated 11.3 million immigrants in the US without papers who face deportation.
In 1970, only two mosques existed in the country, but now more than 200 offer sanctuary to Japan's Muslims.
Hundreds of the country's reporters eke out a living by finding news - then burying it for a price.