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Gaddafi's son 'questions Interpol notice'
Saadi denies allegations of corruption and intimidation and called decision to put him on most-wanted list "political".
Last Modified: 02 Oct 2011 22:37
Interpol has issued an alert for Muammar Gaddafi's third son who is currently in Niger [Reuters]

Muammar Gaddafi's son, Saadi, has denied allegations of corruption and intimidation and has called Interpol's decision to put him on the equivalent of its most-wanted list as political, according to an email sent to the AP news agency. 

Saadi, has taken refuge in the west African nation, where he fled after Tripoli fell to revolutionary forces.

Saadi "regrets the issue of a red notice by Interpol and strenuously denies the charges made against him," an email forwarded to the AP news agency said.

In the email, Saadi called the Interpol notice a "clear political decision to recognize the de jure authority of the National Transitional Council taken without appropriate regard to the current absence of a functioning, effective and fair system of justice in Libya."

On Thursday, Interpol, said it had issued an alert for Saadi Gaddafi, who is accused of leading military units responsible for crackdowns on protests and of misappropriating property.

The international police agency said the notice was issued in response to a request by the NTC, which has assumed leadership of the north African nation.

Niger, which borders Libya in the south and had for long benefited from Gaddafi's largesse, has said it would study the issue.

Niger's position

Earlier, the government of Niger has said that it will not extradite Muammar Gaddafi's son any time soon, but the NTC were welcome to question Saadi.

Marou Amadou, Niger's justice minister, who is also the government spokesman, said on Niger national television late on Saturday that Saadi could be questioned under an existing cooperation agreement between Tripoli and Niamey.

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"If it is to question Saadi, the National Transitional Council (NTC), which we have recognised, can freely come to Niger, under the existing accord," said Amadou.

"However, I reaffirm that at this stage...there is no possibility of extraditing Saadi, because ultimately what needs to be applied is international conventions," he said.

Saadi's exact whereabouts in Niamey have not been disclosed.

Niger has maintained that it does not want to extradite Saadi to a country where he would not be given a fair trial and risked the death penalty.

However, current international laws would permit Saadi's extradition to any independent international court or democratic country, Amadou said.

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
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