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Africa
New Libyan government 'within 10 days'
Mahmoud Jibril says the ministers could be divided between the east and west of the country.
Last Modified: 21 Sep 2011 03:56
Jibril said he was not bothered by the delay in bringing about some sort of national consensus over the cabinet [AFP]

A new Libyan government will be announced within seven to 10 days, the transitional leadership's interim prime minister has said in New York.

"Government to be announced within a week, 10 days maximum," Mahmoud Jibril told reporters on Tuesday, adding the ministers could be divided between the east and west of the country.

"I'm not bothered by (the) time ... to bring about national consensus," he said.

He was speaking at a press conference hosted by G8 foreign ministers after the new Libyan leaders were welcomed to the United Nations, enshrining their new-found status after ousting long-time ruler Muammar Gaddafi.

On Sunday Jibril had had to delay the unveiling of a new Libyan government, saying it was held up by last-minute haggling.

Jibril, a former Gaddafi regime official, said then that many of the portfolios for the new cabinet had been agreed, but there were still discussions going on over others.

"Most of the work has been done. It is a question of the number of ministries and the location of the ministries."

He said they could all be in the capital, Tripoli, but it was possible they could be divided between between the east and west of Libya.

The transitional council was based in Benghazi in the east of the country. Tripoli is in the west.

"For a country which was absent from any democratic process for 42 years from any institutions, from any democratic culture, what's taking place is natural," said Jibril.

"I think we better have good consultation, we had better talk before we act.

"I think this government, when formed, will help tremendously to bring about stability and order in Tripoli and the rest of the country.

G8 help

Meanwhile, Libya has been added to the list of Arab countries that have seen political revolutions or deep change that will benefit from a G8 arrangement set up by France, which holds the G8 presidency this year.

The so-called Deauville Partnership will inject about $80 billion and international expertise into the new democracies, though as a relatively wealthy country Libya will not be getting the financial aid.

The cash will be concentrated on Tunisia and Egypt, with some help going to Morocco and Jordan to help the countries with economic development, education and training, rule of law and political reforms.

"We have got to help the countries that are now free," French Foreign Minister Alain Juppe told a press conference after the meeting.

Egypt's Foreign Minister Mohammed Kamel Amr said "an extraordinary and exceptional moment needs extraordinary and exceptional ways to deal with it."

Source:
Agencies
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