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Judge adjourns trial of Egypt's ex-minister
Judge adjourns trial of Habib al-Adly until next month after four recesses fail to calm defence lawyers' commotion.
Last Modified: 14 Aug 2011 20:09

A judge has adjourned the trial of Habib el-Adly, Egypt's former interior minister, until September 5 due to "commotion" caused by the defence lawyers.

Adly's attendance in court for the continuation of his trial which began in April, was screened on Egyptian state television on Sunday, as he faced charges regarding his alleged use of violence during the Egyptian uprising earlier this year.

The former minister and six senior security officials are accused of giving orders that led to the killing of about 850 demonstrators.

If convicted, Adly, who denies the charges, faces the death penalty.

Judge Ahmed Fahmy Riyaat ordered four recesses within the first three hours of convening, for defence lawyers being "impossible" and for having "unacceptable conduct".

Fraud charges

Adly was the first member of Mubarak's government to be put on trial in another case where he faced charges of fraud and money laundering.

Al-Adly is accused of ordering police to fire on protesters during the revolution [Al Jazeera]

In that case, a judge sentenced him to 12 years in prison for money laundering and ordered him to pay about $2.3m.

The removal of Adly from office was one of the chief demands of protesters when they launched the revolution against Mubarak's regime on January 25.

On the first day of his trial last Wednesday, Mubarak pleaded not guilty to all the accusations against him.

Last Wednesday was his first public appearance since the day before he stepped down as president.

Mubarak, who is reported to be suffering from health problems, will remain in a hospital near Cairo until his trial resumes on Monday.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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