[QODLink]
Africa
Ouattara's forces under new scrutiny
Human Rights Watch says president's forces guilty of killing scores of supporters of former leader since April.
Last Modified: 03 Jun 2011 09:47
 Both Ouattara and Gbagbo forces are accused of heinous crimes against civilians in the Ivory Coast [EPA]

Troops loyal to Alassane Ouattara, the Ivorian president, have killed at least 149 real or suspected supporters of Laurent Gbagbo in Abidjan since the capture and arrest of the former leader, according to Human Rights Watch (HRW).

At least 95 unarmed people mostly from ethnic groups aligned to Gbagbo were executed in operations in late April and May, HRW said in findings that will raise further questions over the behaviour of soldiers already suspected of abuses elsewhere.

"The hope of a new era following President Ouattara's inauguration will fade fast unless these horrible abuses against pro-Gbagbo groups stop immediately," Corinne Dufka, senior West Africa researcher at the New York-based group, said on Thursday.

"The president has repeatedly promised credible, impartial investigations and prosecutions. Now is the time to keep those promises."

Click for for full coverage on Ivory Coast

The findings were based on interviews with 132 victims and witnesses violence by both sides during the battle for Abidjan and just after Gbagbo's April 11 arrest.

Pro-Gbagbo fighters were found to have killed at least 220 men.

Gbagbo's refusal to accept defeat in a November 28 election triggered a four-month conflict in which at least 3,000 civilians were killed, the economy collapsed and cocoa exports from the world's top grower suspended.

Ouattara has insisted justice must apply to all sides and promised to launch a truth and reconciliation process aimed at healing wounds in a country where tensions between northerners and southerners have fuelled a decade of instability.

Hundreds were killed in a massacre in inter-ethnic violence in the western town of Duekoue as forces loyal to Ouattara advanced towards Abidjan in late-March.

A report by the London-based rights group Amnesty International last month said pro-Ouattara troops were involved in the massacre and were responsible for other abuses.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
Remnants of deadly demonstrations to be displayed in a new museum, a year after protests pushed president out of power.
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.