[QODLink]
Africa
Youth leader of SA ruling party re-elected
Julius Malema, who sang a controversial apartheid-era song and favours mining nationalisation, "humbled" by result.
Last Modified: 18 Jun 2011 08:31
  Malema appeals to millions of young, disenfrenchised South Africans still living in abject poverty [EPA] 

The youth wing of South Africa's ruling African National Congress has given its president, Julius Malema, for a second term, endorsing a proponent of mining nationalisation.

The ANC Youth League, arguably the party's most powerful bloc, re-elected an unopposed Malema for another three-year term at its ongoing conference on Friday.

Speaking to the Mail & Guardian newspaper, Malema said that he felt "humbled" by the result.

"I'm humbled by the support that I got and the fact that the comrades have given me the mandate. I shall not disappoint," he said. 

Long considered kingmakers within the ANC, the youth league has been used by senior members of the party to drive policy change and launch leadership races.

Malema helped Jacob Zuma, the South African president, in his 2007 rise to power, although there has been friction between the two since, particularly over the issue of nationalisation.

Zuma has dismissed the league's drives to nationalise mines in the world's biggest platinum producer and seize white-owned farms.

Malema, the son of a domestic worker, has drawn the ire of whites for his singing of apartheid-era songs that advocate the shooting of white farmers.

While his views may have unsettled foreign investors, he has won broad support from the millions of South Africans who are still mired in grinding poverty almost two decades after the end of apartheid.

The four-day youth league conference has drawn about 6,000 delegates.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Featured
About 500,000 participated around the globe in the Peoples Climate March, and Al Jazeera spoke to some in New York.
Separatist movements in Spain, Belgium and Italy may face headwinds following Scotland's decision to stay in the UK.
A fishing trawler carrying 500 migrants across the Mediterranean was rammed by another boat, causing hundreds to drown.
Anti-immigration Sweden Democrats party - with roots in the neo-Nazi movement - recently won 12.9 percent of the vote.
Palestinian doctor who lost three daughters in previous Gaza war is fighting to bring 100 wounded kids to Canada.