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Fresh violence erupts in Tunisia
Death reported in a southern town as protesters continue to demand dismissal of officials associated with old regime.
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2011 20:46 GMT

Fresh anti-government protests have erupted across Tunisia, with one young man dying during clashes in the south of the country.

A police headquarters was set ablaze and army troops deployed in the northwestern town of Kef.

In a separate development on Sunday, Fahrat Rajhi, the new interior minister, suspended all activities of the country's former ruling party, the RCD, according to a statement carried by the official TAP news agency.

Rajhi intends to seek the party's dissolution, the statement said.

Al Jazeera's Nazanine Moshiri, reporting from Tunis, said that the move was made for what the government is terming "security reasons", as many "people are blaming RCD members for violence ... and looting".

Protesters have demanded the dismissal of officials who were closely associated with the government of Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, the former president, who was ousted by a popular revolt three weeks ago.

Kebili death

The fatality was reported in the southern town of Kebili afer he was hit by a tear-gas canister during clashes with security forces on Saturday.

He succumbed to his wounds on Sunday, the state news agency said. Several other people were hospitalised as a result of their wounds.

TAP said that security forces had intervened when protesters attempted to set fire to a national guard post outside the town.

It said the young men then attacked another national guard post, before marching on the governor's residence, prompting the troops to intervene.

Protests and sit-in's were also reported outside the governor's office on Saturday, with protesters calling for him to be replaced.

Kef clashes

In the northwestern town of Kef, the army moved in after at least two people were killed and another 17 injured in clashes on Saturday, according to the interior ministry.

Fresh protests erupted on Sunday, with angry men setting a local police station on fire.

"There's panic in the town. The district's security forces building is on fire," Raouf Hadaoui, a labour union activist, told the AFP news agency.

Hadaoui said several police cars had been torched and fires were threatening to spread from the police station to neighbouring homes.

"The army has been deployed all around the town and is trying to help the ambulance services," he said.

TAP reported that demonstrators had taken documents and equipment from the police station before setting it on fire.

Several hundred demonstrators had been calling for Khaled Ghazouani, the local police chief, to be sacked for abuse of power, the agency said.

Ghazouani slapped a protester during the demonstration on Saturday, and has now been placed under arrest, according to the interior ministry.

In a separate development, two members of the security forces in Sidi Bouzid, in central Tunisia, were arrested over their suspected role in the deaths on Friday of two detainees.

Hundreds had also demonstrated there.

Source:
Al Jazeera and agencies
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