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Africa
Poll result delay worries Sudanese
Opposition rejects partial results of a "rigged" poll, sparking fears of violence.
Last Modified: 20 Apr 2010 13:05 GMT

Results from Sudan's first multi-party election in 24 years, originally expected on Tuesday, have been delayed indefinitely by the national election commission.

"We cannot set a definite date to announce the results because [the counting] is a very complicated process," Hadi Mohammed Ahmed, the head of the committee, said.

International observers from the European Union and the US-based Carter Centre have said the elections did not meet international standards.

The opposition has said the vote was rigged and that they will not accept the results.

The election is likely to see the re-election of Omar al-Bashir, the incumbent president, who seized control of Africa's largest country in a military coup backed by Islamists in 1989.

Since the end of the election, in which southerners also voted for the leader of their semi-autonomous government, the election commission has been announcing the results of the legislative polls as they become available.

So far al-Bashir's National Congress Party is sweeping the boards.

Al Jazeera's Mohammed Adow, reporting from northern Sudan, says al-Bashir could still win international acceptance for his victory.

The international community is more concerned with Sudan maintaining a semblance of stability, he says, as it heads toward a 2011 referendum that could split the Christian and traditionalist south from the Muslim north.

But while the Sudanese people await an announcement, some are worried about the future. There are fears that there could be an outbreak of violence.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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