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Body of missing UAE sheikh found
Body of UAE president's brother missing after a plane crash is found in Moroccan lake.
Last Modified: 30 Mar 2010 15:00 GMT
Heavy rains had hampered the search for Sheikh Ahmed [Reuters] 

Moroccan rescuers have found the body of the brother of United Arab Emirates’ president, four days after his ultra-light aircraft crashed into a Moroccan lake.

Sheikh Ahmed bin Zayed al-Nahayan was the managing director of the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority, considered the world's largest sovereign wealth fund with assets estimated at more than $600bn.

Moroccan investigators who spoke on condition of anonymity said on Tuesday that a team of Moroccan and French divers had found the body.

The pilot, a Spanish national, survived Friday's crash into the artificial lake created by the Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah dam and was taken to hospital, where he was in stable condition.

Sheikh Ahmed was the younger brother of Emirati President Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed al-Nahayan, who is also the ruler of Abu Dhabi, although he was not in the immediate line of succession for the throne of the oil-rich emirate.

He has a home in the area where the ultra-light crashed near the Moroccan capital Rabat.

Dozens of divers from various countries, including Morocco, France, Spain, the UAE and the United States took part in the search.

A Moroccan source said at the weekend that the search had been complicated by recent heavy rain that had left water levels high and swamped surrounding areas.

Sheikh Ahmed's funeral will take place in Abu Dhabi on Wednesday, the state news agency WAM reported.

Source:
Agencies
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