Somalia seeks Afghan-style strategy

Somali PM says Obama's Afghan plan could be replicated in his country to restore order.

    Somalia has lacked a functioning government since 1991 and is a hub for fighters and pirates [AFP]
     

    "Piracy and the growth of Islamic extremism are not the natural state of being. They are but symptoms of an underlying malaise - the absence of government and hope," Sharmarke said.

    "The irony is that it would cost only a quarter of what is being spent right now on the warships trying to combat piracy, to fund our plan and actually solve the problems rather than simply chasing them round the Indian Ocean," he said.

    Obama strategy

    Obama announced this week that the US would send 30,000 more troops to Afghanistan to combat Taliban insurgency, as well as measures aimed at ending corruption and promoting local accountability before a US withdrawal.

    Like the embattled government in Kabul, Sharmarke's UN-backed administration controls only part of the capital, Mogadishu, and is battling to subdue anti-government fighters and pirates who prey on shipping in the Indian Ocean.

    IN DEPTH


    Timeline: Somalia
    Restoring Somalia
    A long road to stability
    Al-Shabab: Somali fighters undeterred
     Somalia at a crossroads
     Somaliland: Africa's isolated state
     What next for Somalia?
     Who are al-Shabab?
     Riz Khan: The vanishing Somalis

    Somalia has lacked a functioning central government since 1991.

    Al-Shabab and other anti-government groups regularly attack government troops and African Union peacekeepers, in efforts to force them out of the country.

    Al-Shabab and allied groups control much of southern and central Somalia and want to impose their version of sharia, or Islamic law, in the country.

    The Horn of Africa state hit the headlines again this week when a suicide bomber struck a medical graduation ceremony and killed at least 22 people, including three government ministers, several doctors, students and their relatives.

    Western security agencies have said Somalia has become a safe haven for fighter groups, which include foreigners who are using Somalia to plot attacks across the impoverished region and beyond.

    Fighting has killed at least 19,000 civilians since the start of 2007 and driven another 1.5 million people from their homes, triggering one of the world's worst humanitarian disasters.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    More than 300 people died in Somalia but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Japan's third-largest steelmaker has admitted it faked data on parts used in cars, planes and trains.