Somali minister held in Uganda

Uganda officials say state defence minister held as "security measure", not kidnapped.

    Ugandan troops make up about half the African Union peacekeeping force in Somalia [AFP]

     

     

    "We quickly realised he was a minister," Mugira told the AFP news agency. "It was not a kidnapping."

    Uganda's military makes up about half the African Union peacekeeping force in Somalia, and both countries are allied against Somalia's rebels.

    'Legal papers'

    Siid Ahmed, Somalia's ambassador to Kampala, confirmed Siad was in Ugandan custody and told the Reuters news agency that the Somali government was seeking more details about the incident.

    "We want to know what happened, but it seems to have something to do with legal papers," he said.

    A powerful Mogadishu warlord and former member of Islamic Courts Union which briefly took control in 2006, Siad is now a key member of Somalia's internationally-backed transition government that is battling rebels.

    Siad's disappearance had earlier sparked fears he may have been abducted by fighters or a foreign intelligence service.

    A Ugandan military spokesman said Siad was picked up because of "unclear reasons" for visiting Kampala.

    "It is true. He is in our hands. He came here for unclear reasons and we picked an interest in him," Lieutenant-Colonel Felix Kulayigye told Reuters.

    "You can't come here as a high profile person without notice."

    Somalia has been ravaged by violence and anarchy since regional commanders overthrew Mohamed Siad Barre, the then president, in 1991, before turning on each other.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    The woman who cleans up after 'lonely deaths' in Japan

    The woman who cleans up after 'lonely deaths' in Japan

    When somebody dies lonely and alone, Miyu Kojima steps in to clean their home and organise the mementos of their life.

    Putin and the 'triumph of Christianity' in Russia

    Putin and the 'triumph of Christianity' in Russia

    The rise of the Orthodox Church in Russia appears unstoppable, write filmmakers Glen Ellis and Viktoryia Kolchyna who went to investigate the close ties between the church and Putin.

    The chill effect: Is India's media running scared?

    The chill effect: Is India's media running scared?

    Much of India's media spurns a scoop about the son of PM Modi's right-hand man. Plus, NFL as platform for race politics.