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Africa
Opposition leader faces probe
Former parliamentarian says he has no reason to run from graft allegations.
Last Modified: 31 Oct 2009 01:09 GMT
President Tandja has been criticised for his moves
to extend his powers [EPA]

Niger's leading opposition figure has said he is ready to face charges of money laundering, a day after a warrant was issued for his arrest.

Security officials made no effort to detain Mahamadou Issoufou when he returned home on Friday from Abuja, the Nigerian capital, where he had been in talks with the Economic Community Of West African States (ECOWAS).

Issoufou is one of dozens of former parliamentarians caught up in a corruption investigation that critics say is an attempt by Mamadou Tandja, Niger's president, to muzzle his opponents and tighten his grip the West African nation.

"The fact that I have returned means something very simple. I have nothing to run away from," Issoufou said.

"I heard that they issued an international arrest warrant for me. The powers that be didn't have to go to that length. They could have simply called me to face a judge and I would have turned up."

Several thousand supporters of Issoufou's Nigerien Party for Democracy and Socialism (PNDS) turned up at Niamey airport to welcome him and accompanied him home.

'Dubious' transactions

The case against Issoufou is the latest chapter in a political crisis that has seen Tandja extend his time as president, increase his powers and remove presidential term limits, a move that has been criticised at home and internationally.

"You know, dictatorial regimes don't like the idea of an opposition existing. They don't like the idea of them so they criminalise them and accuse them of terrible things like money laundering"

Bazoum Mohamed,
PNDS party vice-president

The Reuters news agency quoted a senior legal source as saying that the money laundering investigation had found "numerous transactions" of large amounts of money "from dubious origins" through Issoufou's accounts, leading to the charges.

Niger authorities say the investigation is aimed at rooting out corruption, but Issoufou's deputy called the charges were politically motivated.

"You know, dictatorial regimes don't like the idea of an opposition existing. They don't like the idea of them so they criminalise them and accuse them of terrible things like money laundering," said Bazoum Mohamed, the PNDS vice- president.

"Issoufou would never take part in shameful practice."

The PNDS, which had previously allied with Tandja, earlier this month boycotted an election to replace parliament after Tandja dissolved it in the run-up to an August referendum boosting his powers.

ECOWAS subsequently suspended Niger's membership from the West African bloc and the country is also facing a possible freeze in European Union development aid.

Source:
Agencies
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