[QODLink]
Africa
Madagascar warns mutinous troops
Soldiers say they are refusing to repress civilian population amid political crisis.
Last Modified: 10 Mar 2009 04:59 GMT
Opposition workers have staged protests
since the beginning of the year [EPA]
 

Madagascar's government has said it will take action against soldiers who rebelled at a key army base amid a deepening political crisis in the country.

Mamy Ranaivoniarivo, the defence minister, said on Monday it would be necessary to take "military measures within the army", without specifying what action might be taken against the soldiers.

Soldiers in Camp Capsat at the outskirts of the capital Antananarivo said on Sunday they would no more take orders from the government, and set up defences outside the camp against a rumoured attack by the presidential guard.

"At the heart of the current crisis is a political problem. This needs a political solution," Ranaivoniarivo said.

"The military should not be manipulated and divided by this crisis."

But the soldiers, who said they were defying orders to put down opposition protests, have denied they had staged a munity.  

"This is not a mutiny," Colonel Noel  Rakotonandrasana, a spokesman of the soldiers, told reporters.

"We cannot accept the repression of the civilian population,"  he said.

Protection

Rajoelina, who wants the president to step down, has been in hiding since Saturday, after security forces intensified a crackdown on his movement.

A UN official said on Monday he had been placed under UN protection.

"In line with efforts to resolve the Madagascan crisis, and preserve peace and stability, the United Nations decided to place Mr Rajoelina under its protection in a diplomatic residence," said Tiebile Drame, the UN envoy to Madagascar's political crisis.

But Yves Sorokabi, an associate UN spokesman in New York, said that Rajoelina was in the French Embassy, not under UN protection.

Madagascar has been in turmoil since the beginning of the year when Andry Rajoelina, the opposition leader, began protests against Marc Ravalomanana, the president.

"We no longer take orders from our hierarchy, we are following our hearts. We were trained to protect property and citizens, not to fire at people. We are with the people," one rebel soldier said.

The presidential guard was criticised last month for shooting dead 28 protesters marching on the presidential palace. Around 100 people have died in Madagascar's political unrest this year.

The opposition called for another anti-government demonstration on Monday in Antananarivo's May 13 square, and around 5,000 protestors marched peacefully in the centre of the capital.

Analysts say the stance of Madagascar's military, which has generally stayed neutral during previous political turmoil, will be pivotal to the final outcome of the power struggle.

"I think this is very serious," Lydie Boka, the chief Madagascar analyst at the French risk group StrategieCo, said about the mutiny.

"It may just be a small number out of 12,000 or 13,000 troops, but if it reaches the lower ranks it could spread very quickly."

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
An innovative rehabilitation programme offers Danish fighters in Syria an escape route and help without prosecution.
Street tension between radical Muslims and Holland's hard right rises, as Islamic State anxiety grows.
Take an immersive look at the challenges facing the war-torn country as US troops begin their withdrawal.
Ministers and MPs caught on camera sleeping through important speeches have sparked criticism that they are not working.
Featured
About 500,000 participated around the globe in the Peoples Climate March, and Al Jazeera spoke to some in New York.
Separatist movements in Spain, Belgium and Italy may face headwinds following Scotland's decision to stay in the UK.
A fishing trawler carrying 500 migrants across the Mediterranean was rammed by another boat, causing hundreds to drown.
Anti-immigration Sweden Democrats party - with roots in the neo-Nazi movement - recently won 12.9 percent of the vote.
Palestinian doctor who lost three daughters in previous Gaza war is fighting to bring 100 wounded kids to Canada.