Madagascar protesters shot dead

Police open fire on opposition supporters in Antananarivo, killing dozens.

    Police opened fire on protesters marching towards an office used by the president [AFP]

    "Antananarivo is now preparing a funeral ceremony for all those who have lost their relatives," she said.

    Doctors said about 180 people arrived at the city's main Ravoahangy Andrianavalona hospital.

    Rajoelina accused the government of murdering civilians.

    "The people were not armed, they only had their courage," he said on his Viva Radio station immediately after the shooting.

    Palace claimed

    Tensions mounted after Rajoelina urged his supporters to march on a palace which belonged to the mayor until the president took power in 2002.

    "This palace belongs to the people and to the city. I have decided to give it to the prime minister," he said during a rally attended by about 20,000 people.

    Rajoelina's supporters also proclaimed him as chairman of a "transition high authority" he had created himself in an attempt to remove Ravalomanana from power.

    Rajoelina, who was dismissed from his position of mayor of Antananarivo after saying he was in charge of the country's affairs, said that all of the island's regions would be represented in the new body, while naming an associate as "prime minister".

    The opposition leader has already launched a legal bid to to remove Ravalomanana through the two houses of parliament and the constitutional court, which has already declared it is not competent to rule on the matter.

    He accuses the president of being a dictator and misspending public money.

    Last month, at least 68 people died when rioting and looting broke out after a similar protest.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    More than 300 people died in Somalia but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    The life and death of Salman Rushdie, gentleman author

    The life and death of Salman Rushdie, gentleman author

    The man we call 'Salman Rushdie' today is not the brilliant author of the Satanic Verses, but a Picassoesque imposter.

    The Beirut Spy: Shula Cohen

    The Beirut Spy: Shula Cohen

    The story of Shula Cohen, aka The Pearl, who spied for the Israelis in Lebanon for 14 years.