[QODLink]
Africa
Kenya police break up sect protest
Dispersal of banned Mungiki in Nairobi comes against backdrop of post-poll tensions.
Last Modified: 05 Mar 2008 16:52 GMT
Kenyans are on edge as a power-sharing agreement to end the political crisis is still to take effect [AFP]

Kenyan police fired tear gas to disperse hundreds of young men demanding the release of a former leader of the banned Mungiki sect.
 
Police in riot gear chased the protesters through Nairobi, the capital, on Wednesday, frightening residents after post-election violence that killed at least 1,000 people and forced 300,000 from their homes.
"We demand the immediate release of Maina Njenga and his cars, which were impounded by the police," a statement from Mungiki members said.
 
John Maina Njenga, a former leader and founder of the sect, is serving a five-year prison sentence for the possession of an illegal firearm.
Mungiki, which means "multitude" in the Kikuyu tribal language, is notorious for beheadings, and was accused of killing hundreds of people during the post-election violence.

'Born-again Christian'

According to local media, Njenga left the sect while in prison, saying he had become a born-again Christian.
   
The Mungiki began in the 1990s as a quasi-religious organisation and portrays itself as a champion of the poor.
   
But police say it is a large organised crime operation, which earns money by extorting protection fees from minibus operators or operating as political "muscle for hire".
   
The sect was banned in 2002 after members armed with knives and clubs killed more than 20 people in a Nairobi slum.
Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Muslim volunteers face questioning and threat of arrest, while aid has been disrupted or blocked, charities say.
Six months on, outrage and sorrow over the mass schoolgirl abduction has disappeared - except for families in Nigeria.
ISIL combatants seeking an 'exit strategy' from Mideast conflict need positive reinforcement back home, analysts say.
European nation hit by a wave of Islamophobia as many young fighters join ISIL in Syria and Iraq.
Featured
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Since she was 16-years-old, Scottish Nationalist Party's Sturgeon has strove for independence from the UK.
Armed group's ransom success with German hostages marks a re-emergence, as authorities investigate ISIL links.
Western nations are moving into the resource-rich country after decades of disinterest, challenging China's interests.