[QODLink]
Africa
Aid workers kidnapped in Somalia
Armed men abduct two foreigners working with Medecins Sans Frontieres.
Last Modified: 26 Dec 2007 12:14 GMT
Puntland has been relatively peaceful
compared to Somalia proper [EPA]
 

Armed men in north-eastern Somalia have kidnapped two foreign aid workers in the port town of Bosaso, a regional official has said.
 
He said two women working with Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders) were taken in the semi-autonomous state of Puntland.
"Two foreign female MSF workers were kidnapped by armed men in central Bosaso. Policemen are chasing the kidnappers," Bile Mohamud Qabowsade, a Puntland information ministry official, said on Wednesday.
On Monday, armed men released a French cameraman who had been kidnapped in the same region for more than a week. Officials said no ransom was paid.
 

Gwen Le Gouil was in Bosaso to shoot a documentary on the mass  smuggling of refugees from Somalia and other war-torn Horn of Africa  countries across the Gulf of Aden to Yemen when he was captured on  December 16.

  

In May, gunmen kidnapped two aid workers - a Kenyan and a  Briton - employed by CARE International in the same region.

  

Puntland, which declared its semi-autonomous status in 1998, is  relatively peaceful compared to Somalia proper, which has been wracked by violence since former dictator Mohamed Siad Barre was  ousted in 1991.

Topics in this article
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Featured
Pro-Russia leaders' election in Ukraine's east shows bloody conflict is far from a peaceful resolution.
Critics challenge Canberra's move to refuse visas for West Africans in Ebola-besieged countries.
A key issue for Hispanics is the estimated 11.3 million immigrants in the US without papers who face deportation.
In 1970, only two mosques existed in the country, but now more than 200 offer sanctuary to Japan's Muslims.
Hundreds of the country's reporters eke out a living by finding news - then burying it for a price.