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Africa
Machete prices chopped in Nigeria
Prices fall as demand for politcal thugs wane after general elections.
Last Modified: 02 Jul 2007 12:58 GMT
Umaru Yar'Adua was elected the Nigerian
president in April [AP]

The price of machetes has halved in Nigeria since the end of general elections after a fall in demand for thugs sponsored by politicians, state-owned News Agency of Nigeria said.

 

"A price survey on machetes, which served as a popular weapon among political thugs in the state, indicated ... a drop in the price of the implement," NAN reported.
 
Machetes are primarily used as a tool for farming in Nigeria but they are also popular among political gangsters.

Usman Masi, a trader quoted by NAN, said: "Before the conduct of the general elections, I was selling a minimum of seven machetes daily but can hardly sell one a day now."

Africa's most populous country returned to civilian rule in 1999 after three decades of almost continuous army rule. Violence remains a feature of politics, especially during the build-up to elections.

 

European election monitors estimated that at least 200 people were killed in politically motivated violence during months of campaigning ahead of the April polls.

Source:
Agencies
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