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Africa
More Kenyan sect members killed
Kenyan police vow to intensify crackdown on the outlawed Mungiki sect.
Last Modified: 09 Jul 2007 10:24 GMT
Slumdwellers of Nairobi are bearing the
brunt of the crackdown [AFP]

Kenyan police have killed eight suspected members of the outlawed Mungiki sect, as part of a widening crackdown on the group blamed for a spate of murders and beheadings.
Julius Ndegwa, Nairobi's police commander, said the suspects were killed in several of the capital's residential neighbourhoods.
He vowed to intensify the fight against the group.

"This is just the beginning of the war against Mungiki. We are not going to relent on this war because we are determined to bring their activities to an end."
The Mungiki sect was banned in 2002 and have been blamed for the deaths of more than 40 people since March.

The government crackdown has left at least 76 Mungiki members dead and seen more than 3,000 arrests throughout Kenya.

The latest violence has set off a debate, with critics accusing politicians of exploiting the country’s jobless youth to spark unrest ahead of presidential elections at the end of the year.
Source:
Agencies
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