[QODLink]
Africa
Mogadishu airport shelled
Nigeria has confirmed that it will contribute to a peacekeeping force in Somalia.
Last Modified: 25 Jan 2007 00:44 GMT
Witnesses said Somali police assaulted civilians at the airport after the attack [EPA]

At least two people have been killed after a barrage of mortar shells was fired into Mogadishu's main airport shortly after a UN plane landed there.
 
The attack in the Somali capital came 15 minutes after a nine-member UN delegation arrived at the airport from Kenya on Wednesday, but there was no indication it was the target.
Passengers and workers at the airport panicked as two of the mortars landed inside the terminal.
 
Mohammed Abdi said: "We heard the first shell behind us, and then another one struck the ground near us, and a third one hit between us and the main road and we took off to seek cover."

Troop base

The airport serves as a base for Ethiopian troops who helped the interim Somali government overthrow Islamic courts fighters late last month.

The UN delegation, from the UN refugee agency and the office for the co-ordination of humanitarian affairs, was taken to the UN compound in Mogadishu where they were meeting with Somali officials as planned.

Witnesses said Somali police forces and Ethiopian troops sealed off the airport and surrounding neighbourhoods after the attack and then assaulted civilians.

Your Views

"Peace is possible if the interests of US and the Ethiopians are removed"

Ahmed, Bossaso, Somalia

Send us your views

A cafe owner at the airport said he had been shot by police.

He said: "Ethiopian troops and Somali police came into my restaurant and beat us very badly. I sustained a small gunshot wound, but I am getting treatment in the hospital."

A police official, who requested anonymity, said "the beating was a case of mistaken identity".

Muhamoud Yassin, a taxi driver, said the situation remained tense: "People are not allowed to and from the facility. There is a heavy security presence."

The attack came a day after a first batch of Ethiopian troops began pulling out of Mogadishu, even though a proposed 7,600-strong African Union (AU) peacekeeping force has yet to be deployed.

Nigeria confirmed on Wednesday that it will send soldiers to join the peacekeeping force but many still doubt that the AU will be able to deploy such a large force and fear a power vacuum if peacekeepers do not arrive before Ethiopian troops leave.

US officials confirmed on Wednesday that the US had conducted a second air strike in Somalia.

The new air strike came two weeks after an AC-130 plane killed what Washington said were eight al-Qaeda fighters hiding among Islamist remnants pushed to Somalia's southern tip by Ethiopian and Somali government forces.

Washington believes Somali Islamists have protected al-Qaeda members accused of bombing US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania in 1998 and an Israeli-owned Kenya hotel in 2002.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.