[QODLink]
Africa
Zambians urged to embrace China
President says he regrets last year's violent anti-Chinese protests.
Last Modified: 26 Jan 2007 10:48 GMT
Mwanawasa said that China will lend the country $39m to buy equipment for building roads [EPA]
Zambia's president has urged the country to be more positive about Chinese firms and their workers, a plea that comes a week before Hu Jintao, China's president, visits the southern African nation.
In a meeting with supporters in Ndola on Thursday, Levy Mwanawasa said he regretted violent anti-Chinese protests that erupted in the country last year and described China's involvement in the Zambian economy as helpful.
"The Chinese government has brought a lot of development to this country and these are the people you are demonstrating against," he said.
 
Zambian labour unions and opposition parties have accused Chinese firms of underpaying workers and compromising safety in Zambia's vast copper mines as they increase their investment in the resource-rich African nation.
 

In July, six miners were shot in a protest at the Chinese-owned Chambishi copper mine. The incident spurred anti-Chinese sentiment and led to criticism that Mwanawasa and his government were too close to Chinese interests.

 

Alleged exploitation

 

"The Chinese government has brought a lot of development to this country and these are the people you are demonstrating against"

Levy Mwanawasa, the Zambian president
An opposition presidential candidate, Michael Sata, made alleged Chinese exploitation of Zambian workers a key part of his unsuccessful attempt to unseat Mwanawasa in an election last year.

 

Mwanawasa, however, has responded to critics by pointing out the benefits of Chinese investment. Zambia is struggling to modernise its infrastructure, especially in the mining sector, the lifeblood of the country's economy.

 

On Thursday, the president announced that China would lend $39m to buy equipment needed to build and repair roads, a sign he said of the Asian giant's good intentions toward Zambia.

 

Mwanawasa told state media: "The feeder roads are in a bad state [and] we are going to use equipment which our counterparts will provide. It is therefore unfair to start criticising the Chinese government."

 

Chinese investment

 

The main focus of Hu's visit to the country next month will be on Chinese investment in Zambia.

 

The Chinese leader will open a smelter designed to produce 150,000 tonnes of copper a year and lay a foundation stone for a five-star hotel the Chinese plan to build in Livingstone, a Zambian official said.

 

Mwanawasa also said the Chinese had agreed to construct a football stadium in Ndola.

 

"The two presidents will also sign a number of co-operation agreements, which will benefit Zambia economically," the official said on condition of anonymity.
Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
Remnants of deadly demonstrations to be displayed in a new museum, a year after protests pushed president out of power.
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.