Philippine Communists welcome unofficial cabinet offer

Presumptive president-elect says he is likely to offer four cabinet posts to Communist party that could bring peace.

    Major political concessions by Duterte are likely to be complicated [Keith Bacongco/Reuters]
    Major political concessions by Duterte are likely to be complicated [Keith Bacongco/Reuters]

    Communist rebel leaders have welcome a possible offer from the Philippines' presumptive president-elect of four cabinet posts.

    The party said on Wednesday that an alliance would need to be based on principles such as social justice and national sovereignty, including an end to the presence of US troops.

    Rodrigo Duterte, who won the May 9 presidential election by a landslide according to an unofficial count, has said he will probably offer the Communist Party of the Philippines cabinet positions in agrarian reform, environment, social welfare and labour.

    "The CPP and the revolutionary forces welcome the possibility of joining presumptive President Duterte in an alliance government, whether in the form of assigning cabinet positions to the CPP or its endorsees or some other more radical form of unity government which the maverick new president might be open to consider," the party said in a statement.

    Philippines vote: Rodrigo Duterte claims victory

    Al Jazeera's Marga Ortigas, reporting from the capital Manila, said the Communist Party will hand Duterte a list of people it feels are acceptable.

    Duterte is also looking into the possibility of releasing all 500 political prisoners, she said.

    "This is something Philippine Communists are very happy to see," she said.

    American troops have no permanent bases in the country, but hold regular joint exercises and have backed Philippine troops battling Abu Sayyaf fighters in the south.

    While Duterte's proposed offer of cabinet posts could foster peace talks, any major political concessions are likely to be complicated, given the many years of fighting and enmity between the rebels and government forces.

    Business and industry leaders would also likely oppose demands such as an end to contractualisation, the widespread practice of short-term employment, and higher wages.

    The government has also relied on closer military ties with the US amid an increasingly tense territorial dispute with China over areas of the South China Sea.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    More than 300 people died in Somalia but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    The life and death of Salman Rushdie, gentleman author

    The life and death of Salman Rushdie, gentleman author

    The man we call 'Salman Rushdie' today is not the brilliant author of the Satanic Verses, but a Picassoesque imposter.

    The Beirut Spy: Shula Cohen

    The Beirut Spy: Shula Cohen

    The story of Shula Cohen, aka The Pearl, who spied for the Israelis in Lebanon for 14 years.