Zimbabwe: Woman promoted to a top air force post

Ellen Chiweshe was given the third-highest position in the country's air force.

    The country’s constitution, adopted in 2013, requires gender parity in all state institutions [Getty Images]
    The country’s constitution, adopted in 2013, requires gender parity in all state institutions [Getty Images]

    A woman has been given one of the most prominent positions in Zimbabwe's air force as she became the southern African country's first female Air Commodore.

    Ellen Chiweshe was promoted to the third-highest post in Zimbabwe's air force.

    The state-run Herald newspaper reported Chiweshe's new rank in Tuesday's edition, which included a photograph of Air Force Commander Perrance Shiri fitting a hat onto her head as part of a promotion ceremony.

    The newspaper quoted Chiweshe as saying: "It was a men's world and it was difficult to break in."

    Chiweshe was promoted "not because of bias or favour but because of her competency", the Herald quoted Shiri as saying.

    "The sky is the limit. There is nothing that can stop women from attaining high posts," he said.

    Zimbabwe's army has a female brigadier general, noted Shiri.

    The country’s constitution, adopted in 2013, requires gender parity in all state institutions, but men remain dominant in top government and military jobs.

     Solar panels powering Zimbabwe's future

    SOURCE: AP


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