Iran Supreme Leader endorses nuclear deal with caveats

Khamenei gives green light for deal with world powers, but warns Tehran must implement it with vigilant monitoring.

    Khamenei has the final say on all major Iranian policies [EPA]
    Khamenei has the final say on all major Iranian policies [EPA]

    Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has endorsed a landmark nuclear deal reached with world powers, but warned against "ambiguities" in the agreement.

    Khamenei, who has the final say on all major Iranian policies, backed the deal in a letter to President Hassan Rouhani that was read on state TV on Wednesday.

    Until now he had publicly declined to approve or reject the deal while expressing support for Iran's negotiators.

    Iran's highest authority said the United States and European Union should clearly announce the elimination of sanctions against Iran, and warned that the deal had several structural weak points.

    He said he approved the decision of the country's top security committee, the Supreme National Security Council, to implement the nuclear agreement, but that it must be "tightly controlled" and monitored "to prevent significant damage" to country's future.


    Related: Khamenei: Opposition to US persists after nuclear deal


    He also warned his country's government to be vigilant, saying the United States cannot be trusted.

    The agreement reached in July with the US, Britain, France, China, Russia and Germany would curb Iran's nuclear activities in exchange for the lifting of crippling international sanctions.

    Western nations have long suspected Iran of pursuing nuclear weapons alongside its civilian programme, charges rejected by Tehran, which insists its programme is entirely peaceful.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    More than 300 people died in Somalia but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Japan's third-largest steelmaker has admitted it faked data on parts used in cars, planes and trains.