India's promise of growth triggers budget wishes

Expectations of the new government's first budget are soaring after New Delhi promises growth.

    India's promise of growth triggers budget wishes
    Some economists say India's economic recovery requires painful reforms and a new approach to saving and spending [Reuters]

    The new Indian government has promised to put one of Asia's largest economies back on a path of high growth.

    Finance Minister, Arun Jaitely, will  on February 28 table the government's first full budget in Parliament.

    People across India are expecting big things but some economists say that requires painful reforms and a new approach to saving and spending.

    The government is contemplating how to make big and necessary changes without upsetting large sections of voters who threw their support behind Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party in overwhelming numbers during last year’s national election.

    Deepak Kumar, 35, Florist
    Deepak Kumar [Nidhi Dutt/Al Jazeera]

    Budget wish: I would like the government to reduce taxes for businesses like mine and make provisions to help us get better access to loans. 

    Ayushi Jain, 20, Student
    Ayushi Jain [Nidhi Dutt/Al Jazeera]

    Budget wish: I would like the government to spend more money to improve the infrastructure of state-run universities. I am graduating soon so I would also like the government to find ways to create more jobs for young people like me.

    Nisar Ahmed, 46, Driver 
    Nisar Ahmed [Nidhi Dutt/Al Jazeera]

    Budget wish: I would like the government to invest in schemes to help poor people like me and also set put money towards bringing 'black' or untaxed money back to India.

    Rakhee Mehraulia, 21, Hospitality professional
    Rakhee Mehraulia [Al Jazeera]

    Budget wish: I would like to see the government spend more money on women’s safety. 

    Mukesh Kumar, 47, Businessman 
    Mukesh Kumar [Nidhi Dutt/Al Jazeera]

    Budget wish: I would like the government to give businesses like mine a tax break and direct the states to charge less Value Added Tax (VAT). 

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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