Bahrain opposition party probed for 'criminal' tweets

Gulf kingdom opens criminal investigation against al-Wefaq, accusing it of circulating false news.

    Bahrain has opened a criminal investigation against the country's main opposition party, accusing it of trying to undermine national security by publishing "criminal content" on its website and Twitter account.

    The interior ministry said on Tuesday it had referred al-Wefaq to the public prosecutor after it documented violations under Bahraini laws.

    It said the violations included "incitement to hatred against the ruling system and circulating false news to undermine civil peace and national security".

    Al-Wefaq frequently publishes online pictures of protests led by the Shia majority against Bahrain's Sunni government.

    Al-Wefaq criticised the decision, which it said aims to "end legitimate opposition and refutes [government] claims of democracy," insisting that the bloc is only "practising its natural political role" as an opponent to
    government policies.

    Authorities are using "the judiciary to punish any political action," a statement added.

    Bahrain has stepped up a crackdown on al-Wefaq after the group and other, smaller opposition parties boycotted elections held in November and organised street protests to show their opposition to the poll.

    Last month, al-Wefaq's head, Sheikh Ali Salman, went on trial on charges of promoting the violent overthrow of the political system. The case has riled his followers and heightened unrest in the Sunni-ruled Gulf Arab state.

    Bahrain has experienced nearly four years of unrest, with a Shia-dominated opposition movement demanding greater political rights.

    The Shia Muslims complain of political and economic marginalisation, an accusation the government denies.

    At least 89 people have been killed in clashes since 2011, while hundreds have been arrested and put on trial, rights groups say.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    More than 300 people died in Somalia but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Japan's third-largest steelmaker has admitted it faked data on parts used in cars, planes and trains.