Cahill's brace sends Australia into Asian Cup semis

China beaten 2-0 in the quarters; South Korea also in the last-four after beating Uzbekistan.

     [REUTERS]
    [REUTERS]

    Tim Cahill came to Australia's rescue again, scoring two goals, one of them among the most spectacular ever seen at an Asian Cup, to lead the host-nation into the semi-finals.

    With teammates all fluffing their chances in front of goal, Cahill took it upon himself to calm Australia's jitters and secure a 2-0 win over China in the quarter-finals at Brisbane's Lang Park.

    Both goals came in the second half.

    Already Australia's all-time leading score, Cahill's brace lifted his international tally to 39 goals from 80 appearances and saved his country's blushes.

    The Australians will now play either Japan or the United Arab Emirates in next week's semi-finals.

    Earlier, Son Heung-min scored twice in extra time to give South Korea a 2-0 win over Uzbekistan and send them into semi-finals.

    The midfielder got on the end of Kim Jin-su's cross and headed the ball through the hands of Uzbekistan keeper Ignatiy Nesterov to break the deadlock after the 104 minutes of end-to-end action at the Rectangular Stadium.

    His second came with time running out at the end of the second period when substitute fullback Cha Du-ri charged down the right wing and centred for Son to crash the ball left-footed into the top of the net.

    SOURCE: Reuters


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