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WikiLeaks denies endorsing Modi

Whistle-blower website denies ever saying BJP's prime ministerial candidate is "incorruptible".

Last updated: 18 Mar 2014 08:12
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Many view Narendra Modi, third from left, as a tough and decisive leader [AFP]

Whistle-blower website WikiLeaks has denied ever endorsing Indian prime ministerial aspirant Narendra Modi as "incorruptible', contrary to claims made by some of the supporters of the opposition Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) leader.

In a series of tweets, the website said "rather he [Modi] is popular because he is viewed as incorruptible".

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The denial came after some BJP workers circulated posters quoting Julian Assange, WikiLeaks founder, as saying that "America was scared of Modi because he is incorruptible".

The BJP responded by insisting that Modi did not need any certificate from either WikiLeaks or Assange.

Modi, the election frontrunner, according to several opinion polls, is promising to provide a graft-free government if voted to power. 

With India's parliamentary elections just a few weeks away, corruption is high on the electoral agenda. The ruling Congress-led UPA government has been tainted by several scams in the recent past, while the upstart Aam Admi Party (Common Man's Party) is touching a chord among voters by vowing a crackdown on corruption.

Though a polarising figure, Modi - the current chief minister of Gujarat state - is largely seen as a tough and decisive leader capable of bringing about development in the impoverished country.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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