Indian women 'sadhus' form all-female group

In a break from tradition, holy Hindu women form their own group, believed to be the first in history of Hinduism.

    The all-female group was formed in the northern city of Allahabad [Reuters]
    The all-female group was formed in the northern city of Allahabad [Reuters]

    Female "sadhus", or holy Hindu women, have broken away from tradition and formed a new all-female group in India that they hope will end male domination of spiritual practices.

    In the northern city of Allahabad a group of women sadhus formally established their group or "akhada", holding ceremonies on the banks of the River Ganges which is considered sacred by Hindus.

    Mahant Trikal Bhavanta, a leading woman sadhu, told AFP that the all-women akhada was believed to be the first in the history of Hinduism in India.

    An akhada is a group of sadhus - reclusive ascetics or wandering monks who renounce normal life and are often widely respected for their holiness. India has more than a dozen such groups, all male-dominated.

    According to some Hindu lore, it is believed the first akhada was formed by Hindu philosopher Adi Shankaracharya in the eighth century with the aim of safeguarding the religion's interests.

    Bhavanta said the all-women group was facing criticism from male sadhus, who claim the move goes against age-old customs.

    "Nowhere in the Hindu scriptures is it mentioned that women cannot have an akhada of their own," she told AFP.

    "We are facing criticism from men because the move ensures that from now on, sanyasins (women sadhus) will also stand to rise in the seers' hierarchy and the subjugation of women in the akhada system run by men will end," Bhavanta added.

    Those who become women sadhus and renounce possessions in a quest for enlightenment are often widows.

    Every 12 years, the Kumbh Mela religious festival is held in Allahabad, drawing legions of wandering holy men and women. Smaller, similar events are held every three years in other locations around India.

    Bhavanta said her akhada would participate with its own flag in the Maha Kumbh to be held in Nasik next year.

    SOURCE: AFP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    More than 300 people died in Somalia but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Japan's third-largest steelmaker has admitted it faked data on parts used in cars, planes and trains.