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Indian cricket chief asked to quit by court

Supreme Court tells N Srinivasan to step down as BCCI chief to ensure fair probe into IPL betting scandal.

Last updated: 25 Mar 2014 08:02
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The scandal stoked public anger and demonstrations against the BCCI chief [EPA]

India's top court has asked the chief of the Indian cricket board to step down to ensure a fair probe of the betting-tainted Indian Premier League (IPL).

N Srinivasan's son-in-law Gurunath Meiyappan has been indicted by a Supreme Court-appointed committee of betting and sharing information to facilitate spot-fixing of IPL matches. Meiyappan was an official of the Chennai Super Kings, a team owned by Srinivasan.

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"Content in sealed envelope are damning. Why is Srinivasan sticking to the chair? If he doesn't quit, we would pass an order," the court said on Tuesday.

Srinivasan, the chairman of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) has steadfastly refused to quit though his son-in-law featured prominently in the betting scandal.

Last year, several cricketers including former Indian pacer S Sreesanth were arrested for their alleged involvement in betting.

The court said Srinivasan's continuance as the BCCI chairman was "nauseating".

The Supreme Court appointed committee headed by Justice Mukul Mudgal had submitted its report to the court on February 10.

The case has been adjourned till March 27.

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Source:
Aljazeera
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