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Wives: Release jailed Al Jazeera journalists

Spouses of two Al Jazeera journalists detained by Egypt speak of their husband's dedication to the the craft.

Last updated: 18 Mar 2014 15:05
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Gehad Khaled and Esraa Mohamed Amar have spoken out about the imprisonment of their husbands: Abdullah al-Shami, who has been detained since August 14; and Mohamed Badr, who was released on February 5 after being arrested in July.

Al-Shami, whom Khaled describes as an "intellectual" and a "free spirit" who "does not like to stay in one place for too long", has been on hunger strike for almost two months and on March 13 had his detention extended by 45 days.

He is one of four Al Jazeera journalists facing charges of spreading "false news" and belonging to a terrorist group.

Cameraman Mohammed Badr was arrested on July 15 while working for Al Jazeera Mubashir Misr, and kept under investigation for nearly seven months. He described being held in an overcrowded cell where inmates had to take turns sleeping on the flooded floor. He also told of being beaten by guards who withheld medical treatment from ill inmates.

Amar told Al Jazeera that Badr met his infant son for the first time upon being released from prison, and described the celebration that ensued. "I was me again," she said.

Khaled anticipated her husband's release, smiling as she detailed what al-Shami would want to cover for his next assignment.

In addition to al-Shami, Al Jazeera journalists Peter Greste, Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohamed have been detained since December 29. 

Al Jazeera rejects the charges against its staff and continues to call for their release.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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