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Santiago Zabala

Santiago Zabala is ICREA Research Professor of Philosophy at the University of Barcelona. His books include The Remains of Being (2009), and, most recently, Hermeneutic Communism (2011, coauthored with G. Vattimo), all published by Columbia University Press.

Santiago Zabala is an EU citizen born in 1975. He was raised in Rome, Vienna, and Geneva. Zabala obtained his MA from the University of Turin, his PhD from the Pontifical Lateran University of Rome and in 2007 was awarded the Humboldt Research Fellowship by Germany's Alexander von Humboldt Foundation for the years 2008/2009 at the University of Potsdam. After spending the Spring semester of 2010 as a Visiting Scholar at Johns Hopkins University Zabala has been appointed ICREA Research Professor of Philosophy at the University of Barcelona where he currently teaches courses on Contemporary Philosophy. He is the author of The Remains of Being (2009), The Hermeneutic Nature of Analytic Philosophy (2008), co-author, with Gianni Vattimo, of Hermeneutic Communism (2011), editor of Weakening Philosophy (2007), The Future of Religion (2005), Nihilism and Emancipation (2004), Art's Claim to Truth (2009), co-editor with Jeff Malpas of Consequences of Hermeneutics (2010) and co-editor with M. Marder of Being Shaken: Ontology and the Event (2013). He also writes opinion articles and reviews for The New York Times, Al Jazeera, the New Statesman, and several academic journals. His web page is http://www.santiagozabala.com/.


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