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Opinion

Back to the state of nature

US commando raids in Libya and Somalia show American power, and its limits, where anarchy rules after state destruction.

Last Modified: 16 Oct 2013 08:57
Deepak Tripathi

Deepak Tripathi, fellow of the Royal Historical Society and the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, is a British historian of the Middle East, the Cold War and America in the post-Soviet world.
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"US commandos seized Abu Anas al-Liby, al-Qaeda's man described as a mastermind of the 1998 American embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania," writes Tripathi [AP]

Recent events in Libya and Somalia have brought into focus some of the grimmest aspects of destroyed state structures, and consequences thereof. In Tripoli, US commandos seized Abu Anas al-Liby, al-Qaeda's man described as a mastermind of the 1998 American embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania. In the Somali coastal town of Barawe, an attack by American commandos failed to kill or capture the leader of al-Shabab, Ahmed Abdi Godane, and the Americans were forced to withdraw

Several days after came the audacious kidnapping and detention of the Libyan Prime Minister, Ali Zeidan, by armed men in the capital. Zeidan was later released, but together these events inform us a good deal about failing states. 

Coming immediately after the Westgate massacre of shoppers in Nairobi, the US commando raids were certainly dramatic, exhibiting America's ability to project military power in distant lands where order is fragile. The raids enabled the Secretary of State John Kerry to proclaim that they, meaning terrorists, "can run but they can't hide" – words that echoed the language used during the George W. Bush presidency in the previous decade. 

However, Kerry's remarks also reflected the new reality after Iraq and Afghanistan – reality in which the world's sole hegemon, the United States, is no longer capable of staying and nation-building. 

America has been forced to change warfare. Its goal now is to economise in terms of money, and reduce its military casualties. Libya and Somalia illustrate this reality, but the new type of warfare also involves risks. After America's commando operation in Tripoli, Libya demanded that Washington explain the attack on Libyan territory, insisting that any Libyan citizen should be prosecuted in Libya. The United States is surely not going to heed that demand. 

There are dangers, however, as the kidnapping of Libya's prime minister in his own capital has shown. In a country divided into many fiefdoms under the control of rival warlords, America's seizure of al-Liby, and his flight out of Libya, may encourage potential recruits. 

The Western "humanitarian" military intervention in Libya on behalf of the anti-Gaddafi forces two years ago has clearly brought a string of unwelcome consequences. Gaddafi's warnings that al-Qaeda was behind the Libyan uprising, whose success would make the country a hub of the organisation, were dismissed as propaganda. Gaddafi's fears were, in part, based on a long history of repression under his own regime, and his cooperation with western governments in the "war on terror". Libya today shows that his warnings had some merit.   

The reasons of al-Liby's capture by the Americans go beyond the 1998 US embassy bombings in Nairobi and Tanzania. Washington's concerns include expansion of al-Qaeda affiliated groups in Libya – and radical fighters, weapons and expertise reaching extremist groups in Syria, enlarging the threat to Western interests in the region. Libya after Gaddafi has become a key source of weaponry to armed groups in Algeria, Tunisia, Egypt, Niger, Mali and other countries which are unstable. 

The collapse of order in Libya is part of a phenomenon seen far and wide in the region. From Afghanistan to the Arab world, including Libya and its North African neighbours, and from Somalia in the east to Nigeria in the west of the African continent, a growing number of states have suffered catastrophic failures. Still others are on the edge. 

There is a sense of return to Thomas Hobbes' state of nature (Leviathan 1651) in which legitimate governance and positive law are absent. Hobbes said that in such a state there is "no arts; no letters; no society; and which is worst of all, continual fear and danger of violent death; and the life of man, solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short". 

The development of conditions which are akin to Hobbes' 17th century nightmare is a remarkable occurrence. The peculiarities of each failing state may vary today. The trigger of upheaval may be unique. The victor and the vanquished, and the scale of lawlessness, may be different. But the pattern is consistent. 

Often, that pattern involves a population revolting against despotism or dictatorship, prompting external players to enter the conflict, escalation of violence and breakdown of institutions that leads to a state of nature. It is a condition in which people live without a common power which keeps them in awe, self-preservation is their only goal, and they are in a state called war. 

The end of World War II in 1945, and freedom for old colonies thereafter, generated relief, happiness and excitement, but there were to be other consequences, most seriously the Cold War. The Germans and the Japanese were defeated. Instead, the Americans and the Soviets emerged as new global masters, and the competition for resources and influence continued. 

For more than four decades, a tenuous peace existed in Europe, but savage proxy wars were fought in other continents. The aim was to control resources, and land and sea routes for trade. After World War II, the Cold War fuelled regional conflicts along the Silk Road, the Persian Gulf, the Suez Canal and in the Indian Ocean while Europe enjoyed a shaky peace. The Soviet Union's demise as a superpower, marking the end of the Cold War around 1990, was thought to end the era of destructive wars. Today, such claims would be a misrepresentation of history.

Deepak Tripathi, fellow of the Royal Historical Society and the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, is a British historian of the Middle East, the Cold War and America in the world.        

You can follow him on Twitter @Deepak_Tripathi 

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The views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect Al Jazeera's editorial policy.

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