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Ellen Cantarow
Ellen Cantarow
Ellen Cantarow is a Boston-based journalist who examines the effects of oil and gas corporations.

Frack fight: A secret war of activists

Opening any part of the country to fracking will certainly damage the environment, beyond the planet's abity to cope.
Last Modified: 21 Nov 2012 08:13
Washington's leadership, when it comes to climate change, is "already mired in failure" [EPA]

There's a war going on that you know nothing about between a coalition of great powers and a small insurgent movement. It's a secret war being waged in the shadows while you go about your everyday life.

In the end, this conflict may matter more than those in Iraq and Afghanistan ever did. And yet it's taking place far from newspaper front pages and with hardly a notice on the nightly news. Nor is it being fought in Yemen or Pakistan or Somalia, but in small hamlets in upstate New York. There, a loose network of activists is waging a guerrilla campaign not with improvised explosive devices or rocket-propelled grenades, but with zoning ordinances and petitions. 

The weaponry may be humdrum, but the stakes couldn't be higher. Ultimately, the fate of the planet may hang in the balance.

All summer long, the climate-change nightmares came on fast and furious. Once-fertile swathes of American heartland baked into an aridity reminiscent of sub-Saharan Africa. Hundreds of thousands of fish dead in overheated streams. Six million acres in the West consumed by wildfires. 

In September, a report commissioned by 20 governments predicted that as many as 100 million people across the world could die by 2030 if fossil-fuel consumption isn't reduced. And all of this was before superstorm Sandy wreaked havoc on the New York metropolitan area and the Jersey shore.

Washington's leadership, when it comes to climate change, is already mired in failure. President Obama permitted oil giant BP to resume drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, while Shell was allowed to begin drilling tests in the Chukchi Sea off Alaska. At the moment, the best hope for placing restraints on climate change lies with grassroots movements. 

In January, I chronicled upstate New York's homegrown resistance to high-volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing, an extreme-energy technology that extracts methane ("natural gas") from the Earth's deepest regions. 

Since then, local opposition has continued to face off against the energy industry and state government in a way that may set the tone for the rest of the country in the decades ahead. In small hamlets and tiny towns you've never heard of, grassroots activists are making a stand in what could be the beginning of a final showdown for Earth's future.

Frack fight 2012

New York isn't just another state. Its largest city isthe world's financial capital. Six of its former governors have gone on to the presidency and Governor Andrew Cuomo seems to have his sights set on a run for the White House, possibly in 2016. 

 

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It also has a history of movements, from abolition and women's suffrage in the 19th century to Occupy in the 21st. Its environmental campaigns have included the watershed Storm King Mountain case, in which activists defeated Con Edison's plan to carve a giant facility into the face of that Hudson River landmark. The decision established the right of anyone to litigate on behalf of the environment.

Today, that activist legacy is evident in a grassroots insurgency in upstate New York, a struggle by ordinary Americans to protect what remains of their democracy and the Earth's fragile environment from giant corporations' intent on wrecking both. On one side stands New York's anti-fracking community; on the other, the natural gas industry, the state's Department of Environmental Conservation, and New York's industry-allied Joint Landowners Coalition. 

As for Governor Cuomo, he has managed to anger both sides. He seemed to bow to industry this past June by hinting that he would end a 2010 moratorium on fracking introduced by his predecessor David Paterson and open the state to the process; then, in October, he appeared to retreat after furious protests staged in Washington, DC, as well as Albany, Binghamton, and other upstate towns.

"I have never seen [an environmental movement] spread with such wildfire as this," says Robert Boyle, a legendary environmental activist and journalist who was central in the Storm King case and founded Riverkeeper, the prototype for all later river-guardian organizations. "It took me 13 or 14 years to get the first Riverkeeper going. Fracking isn't like that. It's like lighting a train of powder."

Developed in 2008 and vastly more expansive in its infrastructure than the purely vertical form of fracking invented by Halliburton Corporation in the 1940s, high-volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing is a land-devouring, water-squandering technology with a greenhouse gas footprint greater than that of coal.

The process begins by propelling one to nine million gallons of sand-and-chemical-laced water at hyperbaric bomb-like pressures a mile or more beneath Earth's surface. Most of that fluid stays underground. Of the remainder, next to nothing is ever again available for irrigation or drinking. 

A recent report by the independent, non-partisan US Government Accountability Office concluded that fracking poses serious risks to health and the environment.

New York State's grassroots resistance to fracking began about four years ago around kitchen tables and in living rooms as neighbours started talking about this frightening technology. Shallow drilling for easily obtainable gas had been done for decades in the state, but this gargantuan industrial effort represented something else again.

Anthony Ingraffea of Cornell University's Department of Engineering, co-author of a study that established the global warming footprint of the industry, calls this new form of fracking an unparallelled danger to the environment and human health.

"There's much more land clearing, much more devastation of forests and fields… thousands of miles of pipelines… many compressor stations [that] require burning enormous quantities of diesel… [emitting] hydrocarbons into the atmosphere." He adds that it's a case of "the health of many versus the wealth of a few".

Against that wealth stands a movement of the 99 per cent - farmers, physicists, journalists, teachers, librarians, innkeepers, brewery owners and engineers. "In Middlefield we're nothing special," says Kelly Branigan, a realtor who last year founded a group called Middlefield Neighbors.

"We're just regular people who got together and learned, and reached in our pockets to go to work on this. It's inspiring, it's awesome, and it's America - its own little revolution."

Last year, Middlefield became one of New York's first towns to use the humblest of tools, zoning ordinances, to beat back fracking. Previously, that had seemed like an impossible task for ordinary people.

In 1981, the state had exempted gas corporations from New York's constitutionally guaranteed home rule under which town ordinances trump state law. In 2011, however, Ithaca-based lawyers Helen and David Slottje overturned that gas-cozy law by establishing that, while the state regulates industry, towns can use their zoning powers to keep it out.

Since then, a cascade of bans and moratoria - more than 140 in all - have protected towns all over New York from high-volume frack drilling. 

This is what democracy looks like

Caroline, a small hamlet in Tompkins County (population 3,282), is the second town in the state to get 100 per cent of its electricity through wind power and one of the most recent to pass a fracking ban. Its residents typify the grassroots resistance of upstate New York. 

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"I'm very skeptical that multinational corporations have the best interests of communities at heart," Don Barber, Caroline's Supervisor, told me recently. "The federal government sold [Americans] out when they exempted fracking from the Clean Water and Air Acts," he added. 

"Federal and state governments are not advocating for the civil society. There's only one level left. That's the local government, and it puts a tremendous load on our shoulders."

Caroline's Deputy Supervisor, Dominic Frongillo, sees local resistance in global terms. "We're unexpectedly finding ourselves in the ground zero for climate change," he says.

"It used to be somewhere else, mountaintop removal in West Virginia, deep-sea drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, tar sands in Alberta, Canada. But now... it's right here under our feet in upstate New York. The line is drawn here. We can't keep escaping the fossil fuel industry. You can't move other places, you just have to dig in where you are."

Two years of pre-ban work in Caroline included an election that replaced pro-drilling members of the town board with fracking opponents, public education forums, and a six-month petition drive. "We knocked on every single door two or three times," recalls Bill Podulka, a retired physicist who co-founded the town's resistance organisation, ROUSE (Residents Opposed to Unsafe Shale Gas Extraction).

"Many people were opposed to gas-drilling but were afraid to speak out, not realising that the folks concerned were a silent majority." In the end, 71 per cent of those approached signed the petition, which requested a ban.

On September 11, a final debate between drilling opponents and proponents took place, after which Barber called for the vote. A ban was overwhelmingly endorsed.

"For the first time," he told the crowd gathered in Caroline's white clapboard town hall, "I will be voting to change the balance of rights between individuals and civil society. This is because of the impacts of fracking on health and the environment. And the majority of our citizens have voted to pass the ban." The board then ruled 4 to 1 in favour.

Stealth invasion

About a year and a half ago, as Caroline and other towns were moving to protect their land from the industry, XTO, a subsidiary of Exxon-Mobil Corporation, began preparing for a possible fracking future in the state. 

It eyed tree-shaded, Oquaga Creek, a trout-laden Delaware tributary in upper New York State's Sanford County, leased the land and applied to the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) for a water-withdrawal permit. XTO required, it said, a quarter of a million gallons of water from the creek every day for its hydraulic fracturing operations.

Delaware Riverkeeper, an environmental organisation, found out about the XTO application and spread the word. Within days, the DRBC received 7,900 letters of outrage. 

On June 1, 2011, hundreds of citizens, organised by grassroots anti-frackers, packed a hearing in Deposit, a village in Sanford Township that lies at the confluence of the creek and the western branch of the Delaware River. Only two people spoke at the meeting in favour of XTO. One was the Supervisor (mayor) of Sanford, Dewey Decker. He applauded the XTO application and denounced protesters as "outsiders".  

 

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He is among a group of landowners who have leased land to XTO for hundreds of millions of dollars. (Decker refused to be interviewed for this article.) The rest of the crowd spoke up for the creek, its fish, and its wildlife. The Delaware River Basin Commission indefinitely tabled the XTO application.

While a grassroots victory, the episode also served as a warning about how determined the industry is to move forward with fracking plans despite the state-enforced moratorium still in place. As a result, Caroline and other towns are continuing to develop local anti-fracking measures, since they know that the 2010 ban on the process will end whenever Governor Cuomo okays rules currently being written by the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).

When it comes to those rules and fracking more generally, the DEC has a conflict of interest. While it is supposed to protect the environment, it is also tasked with regulating the very industries that exploit it through the agency's Mineral Resources Division.

Last year, the DEC received over 80,000 written comments on the latest draft of its guidelines for the industry, the 1,500-page "SGEIS" (which stands for "Supplemental Generic Environmental Impact Statement"). Drilling opponents outnumbered proponents 10 to 1. The deluge was a record in the agency's history.

Activists weren't the only ones with a keen interest in the SGEIS, however. Documents obtained through New York's Freedom of Information Law indicate that, in mid-August 2011, six weeks before the DEC made its statement public, the agency shared detailed summaries of it with gas corporation representatives, giving the industry a chance to influence the final document before it went public.

Two days before the SGEIS was opened to public scrutiny, an attorney for the Oklahoma-based Chesapeake Energy Corporation and other companies asked regulators to "reduce or eliminate" a requirement for the sophisticated testing of fracking fluids. 

Such fluids are laden with toxins, including carcinogens, which storms could wash away from drilling sites - an especially grim prospect given the catastrophic flooding experienced in the state over the last three years.

At the same time, two upstate New York journalists revealed that Bradley Field, the head of the DEC's Mineral Resources Division, had signed a petition that denied the existence of climate change. 

Formerly of Getty Oil and Marathon Oil, Field also serves as the state's representative to the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission and the Ground Water Protection Council, both industry fronts which maintain that fracking is benign. As this was coming to light, state officialsanonymously leaked word of a plan to open five counties on New York's border with Pennsylvania to fracking as long as communities there supported the technology.

This is what autocracy looks like                                       

In May 2012, Dewey Decker and his board passed a resolution pledging thatthe town of Sanford would take no action against fracking, while awaiting the decision of the DEC. There was no prior notice. Citizens were left to read about it in their local papers. "You wake up the next morning and say, 'What happened?'" commented Doug Vitarious, a retired Sanford elementary school teacher. 


In June, a headline in the Deposit Courier, a Sanford paper, read "Local Officials in Eligible Communities Approve Pro-Drilling Resolutions". Accompanying the piece was a map of towns that had passed such resolutions.

The subscript under the map read: "Joint Landowners Coalition of NY". The JLCNY is the state's grassroots gas industry ally, whose stated mission is to "foster... the common interest... as it pertains to natural gas development". Decker represents the organisation in Sanford.

During the summer, Vitarious and other citizens asked their town board where the resolution had originated, but were met with silence. They requested that the board rescind the resolution and conduct a referendum. Decker refused.

By the end of August, 43 towns in the region had passed resolutions modelled on one appearing at the JLCNY website. It stipulates that at the local level "no moratorium on hydraulic fracturing will be put in place before the state of New York has made it's [sic] decision".

Under New York's Freedom of Information Law, Catskill Citizens for Safe Energy and the National Resources Defence Council obtained records from Sanford and two other towns about howthey achieved their objectives. The records, says Bruce Ferguson of Catskill Citizens for Safe Energy, "detail contacts between gas industry operatives and officials".

Two months before superstorm Sandy swamped parts of the state, Sue Rapp, a psychotherapist fromthetown of Vestal, told me that flooding worries her as much as anything else about fracking. Upper New York State suffered flooding in 2010 and 2011. And then came Sandy. Floods turn millions of gallons of fracking waste-water for which there is no safe storage into streams of poisons that wash into waterways.

Unlike Sanford's board, Vestal's has not formally blocked debate. It has heard arguments for a moratorium by Rapp and an organisation she co-founded, Vestal Residents for Safe Energy (VERSE), as well as pleas for a moratorium by physicians and academics.

Its reaction, however, has simply been to sit on its hands, waiting for the DEC and Cuomo to make a final decision. This amounts to adopting the JLCNY position in all but formal vote. "What is happening?" asked Rapp rhetorically at a demonstration in Binghamton this past September. 

"They are trying to shut us down. But we do vote and we will vote. We do not constitute [what pro-drillers call] the tyranny of the majority, but simply the majority. That is called democracy."

Demonstrations against Cuomo's frack plan, which drew thousands to Washington, DC, Albany, and elsewhere in New York, included pledges to commit sustained acts of civil disobedience should the governor carry out plans to open the Pennsylvania border area of the state to fracking.

At the end of September, the New York Times announced that Cuomo had retreated from his June stance. The report credited the state's grassroots movement for his change of mind. Legendary for his toughness and political smarts, the governor will confront a political challenge in the coming months. Either he will please gas-industry supporters or his Democratic base. Whichever way he goes, it could affect his chances for the White House.

The stakes, however, are far larger than Cuomo's presidential aspirations. Opening any part of the state to fracking will certainly damage the local environment. More importantly, a grassroots win in New York State could open the door to a nationwide anti-fracking surge. 

A loss might, in the long run, result ina cascade of environmental degradation beyond the planet's ability to cope. As unlikely as it sounds, the fate of the Earth may rest with the residents of Middlefield, Caroline, Vestal, and scores of tiny villages and small towns you've never heard of.

"All eyes are on New York," says Chris Burger, a former Broome County legislator and one of a small group who persuaded New York's last governor, David Paterson, to pass the state's moratorium on fracking.

"This is the biggest environmental issue New York has ever faced [and not just] New York, the nation, and the world. If it's going to be stopped, it will be stopped here." 

Ellen Cantarow first wrote from Israel and the West Bank in 1979. A TomDispatch regular, her writing has been published in The Village Voice, Grand Street, Mother Jones, Alternet, Counterpunch and ZNet, and anthologised by the South End Press. She is also lead author and general editor of an oral-history trilogy, Moving the Mountain: Women Working for Social Change, published in 1981 by The Feminist Press/McGraw-Hill, widely anthologised and still in print.

A version of this article first appeared on TomDispatch.com.

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The views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect Al Jazeera's editorial policy.

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