[QODLink]
In Pictures
In Pictures: Ahmedabad's segregated Muslims
Gujarat city has seen infrastructure boom but community has been pushed to ghettos with lack of basic amenities.
Last updated: 30 Apr 2014 07:12
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

The economic model of western Indian state of Gujarat has been one of the biggest talking points during the campaigning for the parliamentary elections.

The state has recorded impressive growth under Narendra Modi, the prime ministerial candidate of the opposition Bharatiya Janata Party, who has promised to emulate the state's "success" at national level.

 

However, academics and members of civil society are divided on what is being touted as "Gujarat model" of development, which critics say has left out the state's Muslims.

Under Modi's watch, Ahmedabad, has seen massive infrastructure growth, and is one of the largest cities in the country, with a population of nearly six million.

Ahmedabad has emerged as one of the most "preferred city to live in" with uninterrupted power supply, sprawling shopping malls, multiplexes, flyovers, bus rapid transit system (BRTS) and high rise apartments, but the city's infrastructure boom has hardly touched the Muslim community, who are forced to live in slum-like conditions.

Modi - who has been heading the state government for more than a decade - has also been criticised for his role in the deadly 2002 riots and the subsequent treatment of riot-affected Muslims.

The 600-year-old city has fragmented into newly developed Hindu areas with all the amenities like piped water and cooking gas, high rise apartments for gated communities, private schools, while Muslims have been consigned to ghettos with no street roads, sewerage, or clean water.

Each year about 2,000 children are denied school admission in Juhapura, the largest Muslim ghetto in the city, because of the lack of public or private schools.

Areas such as Juhapura with approximate population of 400,000, Millatnagar and Citizen Nagar are marked with absolute absence of any civic amenities such as drinking water, sewerage, street roads and schools.

Citizen Nagar was set up as a temporary camp to give shelter to people, who fled their homes during the 2002 riots, but it has burgeoned into a big slum and government apathy is palpable. Many here say they have tried to find housing elsewhere in the city, but their Muslim names and lack of funds prevent them from moving out.

Mahesh Langa is the special correspodent for the English Daily, the Hindustan Times.

Photos by Divyaraj Gadhavi.


/Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera

This is the entrance of Maninagar, a constituency Narendra Modi has represented since 2002. A middle class area in southern Ahmedabad, Maninagar has seen a complete transformation with infrastructural facilities created by the state and civic authorities.



/Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera

The Modi government launched Sabarmati Riverfront project in Ahmedabad modelled on Thames riverfront in London. The 10.4km stretch of walkway is open for public use. It was inaugurated in 2012. Slums on both sides of the riverbed were rehabilitated, but activists say more than a thousand families were displaced and found no rehabilitation.



/Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera

Ahmedabad's main Ashram Road that begins from the historical Sabarmati Ashram from where Mahatma Gandhi had launched movement for Indiaís independence from the British colonial rulers. Ashram Road is the main commercial road in the city.



/Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera

Millatnagar is a slum area located on the bank of Chandola lake. It is a Muslim ghetto with a population of about 20,000 people. Millatnagar is part of Maninagar assembly constituency, which is represented in the Gujarat assembly by Chief Minister Narendra Modi. He has never visited the area.



/Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera

Millatnagar is a story of broken down shacks built on the narrow and filthy streets. Most of the families here have one room shack and there are no drinking water or sewerage facility. More than 50 percent of the families have to defecate in the open on the other side of the lake due to lack of toilets.



/Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera

Many people in the area do embroidery work inside their houses to earn a living. People of the area are daily wagers who get works such as embroidery or hand printing on textiles. Children also help their parents in the works.



/Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera

Approach road to Millatnagar where Maninagar's famed roads give way to dusty streets full of potholes. The area is surrounded by factories which emit poisonous and toxic smoke. Itís difficult to breathe normally particularly in the evening due to smoke.



/Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera

Citizen Nagar was built by Muslim NGOs to rehabilitate victims of Naroda Patiya massacre of 2002 in Ahmedabad. Forty houses were built to rehabilitate as many families in the area, which is near the city's largest garbage yard.



/Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera

A huge mountain of garbage can be seen behind the houses. Constant stink and poisonous gas emanating from the garbage yard makes the entire area un-livable for human beings.



/Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera

Citizen Nagar resident Reshmaben, 58, is with her granddaughter at their one-room house. She is an eyewitness to Naroda Patiya massacre case in which 98 people of the minority community were killed. She makes a "rakhi" that is used during Hindu festival of Raksha Bandhan. She complains of skin diseases because their house is near the cityís largest garbage yard.



/Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera

Jabbar Allhabaksha Sheikh, another resident of Citizen Nagar, is a daily wager earning about $3 a day that is hardly enough to feed the family of five members.




Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
images:
/mritems/images/2014/4/23/201442316358533399_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/4/23/201442316358689280_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/4/23/201442316358814318_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/4/23/201442316358939209_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/4/23/20144231635964312_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/4/23/201442316359205336_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/4/23/201442316359345253_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/4/23/201442316359470253_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/4/23/201442316359595249_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/4/23/201442316359736951_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/4/23/20144231640251168_8.jpg
captions:

This is the entrance of Maninagar, a constituency Narendra Modi has represented since 2002. A middle class area in southern Ahmedabad, Maninagar has seen a complete transformation with infrastructural facilities created by the state and civic authorities.

;*;

The Modi government launched Sabarmati Riverfront project in Ahmedabad modelled on Thames riverfront in London. The 10.4km stretch of walkway is open for public use. It was inaugurated in 2012. Slums on both sides of the riverbed were rehabilitated, but activists say more than a thousand families were displaced and found no rehabilitation.

;*;

Ahmedabad(***)s main Ashram Road that begins from the historical Sabarmati Ashram from where Mahatma Gandhi had launched movement for Indiaís independence from the British colonial rulers. Ashram Road is the main commercial road in the city.

;*;

Millatnagar is a slum area located on the bank of Chandola lake. It is a Muslim ghetto with a population of about 20,000 people. Millatnagar is part of Maninagar assembly constituency, which is represented in the Gujarat assembly by Chief Minister Narendra Modi. He has never visited the area.

;*;

Millatnagar is a story of broken down shacks built on the narrow and filthy streets. Most of the families here have one room shack and there are no drinking water or sewerage facility. More than 50 percent of the families have to defecate in the open on the other side of the lake due to lack of toilets.

;*;

Many people in the area do embroidery work inside their houses to earn a living. People of the area are daily wagers who get works such as embroidery or hand printing on textiles. Children also help their parents in the works.

;*;

Approach road to Millatnagar where Maninagar(***)s famed roads give way to dusty streets full of potholes. The area is surrounded by factories which emit poisonous and toxic smoke. Itís difficult to breathe normally particularly in the evening due to smoke.

;*;

Citizen Nagar was built by Muslim NGOs to rehabilitate victims of Naroda Patiya massacre of 2002 in Ahmedabad. Forty houses were built to rehabilitate as many families in the area, which is near the city(***)s largest garbage yard.

;*;

A huge mountain of garbage can be seen behind the houses. Constant stink and poisonous gas emanating from the garbage yard makes the entire area un-livable for human beings.

;*;

Citizen Nagar resident Reshmaben, 58, is with her granddaughter at their one-room house. She is an eyewitness to Naroda Patiya massacre case in which 98 people of the minority community were killed. She makes a "rakhi" that is used during Hindu festival of Raksha Bandhan. She complains of skin diseases because their house is near the cityís largest garbage yard.

;*;

Jabbar Allhabaksha Sheikh, another resident of Citizen Nagar, is a daily wager earning about $3 a day that is hardly enough to feed the family of five members.

Daylife ID:
5c88525eeffffe9258fc5e63c4123697
Photographer:
;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;
Image Source:
Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera;*;Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera;*;Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera;*;Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera;*;Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera;*;Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera;*;Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera;*;Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera;*;Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera;*;Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera;*;Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera;*;Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera
Gallery Source:
Daylife
Daylife Raw Data:
Maningarhttp://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningaren-ussupport@newscred.comUntitled Site10Wed, 23 Apr 2014 16:00:57 GMT http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/5a2001626c8dc51a774a4e8141f6fc3chttp://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/5a2001626c8dc51a774a4e8141f6fc3cDivyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/ec1fa457b79ccbcf631466e0e4a5e118http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/ec1fa457b79ccbcf631466e0e4a5e118Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/5b9f3eb7081482dd4b02495c5cca339dhttp://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/5b9f3eb7081482dd4b02495c5cca339dDivyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/91124e79c18820555a9dba84d9b72e4ahttp://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/91124e79c18820555a9dba84d9b72e4aDivyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/daab9cb930b8aef43fec03358d3d752dhttp://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/daab9cb930b8aef43fec03358d3d752dDivyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/a70c59e90f6f43df7e2ecc56dc51ba21http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/a70c59e90f6f43df7e2ecc56dc51ba21Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/3565eda10d6c5dd4f85a8a6d825df07ahttp://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/3565eda10d6c5dd4f85a8a6d825df07aDivyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/b1191a145d42ef7b11ebd6d4a2aee304http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/b1191a145d42ef7b11ebd6d4a2aee304Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/ab2f3992cb7a0c3c08fd130423b857dfhttp://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/ab2f3992cb7a0c3c08fd130423b857dfDivyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/2edf0ee4efaa3c7f5ad4e1bdc86ac563http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/2edf0ee4efaa3c7f5ad4e1bdc86ac563Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/b0bdd1d7f459a4f5b9c5e47f429451fbhttp://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/b0bdd1d7f459a4f5b9c5e47f429451fbDivyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/4a85c81d7c7a34bfea424497814b9573http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Maningar/slideshow/no-caption/4a85c81d7c7a34bfea424497814b9573Divyaraj Gadhavi/Al Jazeera

Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.