[QODLink]
In Pictures
In Pictures: Crimea's referendum
Pro-Russian sentiment ran high on Sunday as the vast majority of Crimeans decided to secede from Ukraine.
Last updated: 20 Mar 2014 20:32
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback

The Crimea peninsula held its hastily convened referendum on Sunday, asking voters whether or not they want to reunify with Russia. According to initial exit polls provided by election officials, more than 90 percent of voters chose "yes".  

In the short run-up to the referendum, rival rallies were held around the region but few were in any doubt what the results would ultimately be. Days before, a giant Russian flag flew on the grounds of parliament, while symbols of support for reunification and for Russia were widespread. 

A prominent "yes" campaign saw posters promoting the idea of Crimea and Russia together, but there was no sign of a "no" campaign and pro-Ukrainian media reportedly were restricted. 

On the day of the election, a steady stream of voters passed through the numerous polling booths, dropping their ballot papers into transparent boxes where there were few signs of votes against reunification.  

Upon exiting the polling stations, numerous voters expressed their anger at the new government in Kiev as well as their historic and current social, cultural and economic ties with Russia.  

Despite the apparently high turnout, the minority Crimean Tatar community chose to boycott the vote, while others expressed their frustration over the lack of options presented on the ballot.

Before the polls closed, people started to gather in Lenin Square, the central square in the Crimean capital of Simferopol, to celebrate the victory even before the official announcement.


/George Henton/Al Jazeera

At night, the words 'Crimean Spring' are projected onto a government building in Simferopol's Lenin Square prior to a victory party amid exit polls suggesting at least 90 percent voted in favour of joining Russia.



/George Henton/Al Jazeera
Around Simferopol, support for joining Russia appeared to be widespread.


/George Henton/Al Jazeera
Ballots were cast in transparent boxes.


/George Henton/Al Jazeera

Soldiers and tanks believed to be Russian returned to the streets of Simferopol for the vote; however, they were not posted near any of the polling stations.



/George Henton/Al Jazeera

In a small square near parliament, pro-Russian Crimeans painted banners to show their support for the 'yes' vote.



/George Henton/Al Jazeera

The referendum offered voters two choices, in three different languages: either reunify Crimea with Russia, or restore the 1992 constitution, which would provide Crimea with greater autonomy. There was no option to maintain the status quo.



/George Henton/Al Jazeera
Days before the vote, a large Russian flag flew on the grounds of the Crimean parliament.


/George Henton/Al Jazeera
Crimean Prime Minister Sergei Aksyonov speaks at a press conference on the referendum.


/George Henton/Al Jazeera

Pro-Ukrainian rallies tended to be much smaller, sober affairs. They were largely overlooked by members of pro-Russian "self-defence" groups that attacked similar gatherings in other cities.



/George Henton/Al Jazeera
Before the election, rival rallies were held in Simferopol. Pro-Russian rallies attracted far more people.



Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
images:
/mritems/images/2014/3/17/201431772116945328_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/3/17/201431772117195703_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/3/17/201431772117430466_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/3/17/201431772117570924_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/3/17/201431772117711632_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/3/17/201431772117899736_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/3/17/201431772118164356_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/3/17/201431772118852806_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/3/17/201431772119445587_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2014/3/17/20143177212039294_8.jpg
captions:

At night, the words (***)Crimean Spring(***) are projected onto a government building in Simferopol(***)s Lenin Square prior to a victory party amid exit polls suggesting at least 90 percent voted in favour of joining Russia.

;*;Around Simferopol, support for joining Russia appeared to be widespread.;*;Ballots were cast in transparent boxes.;*;

Soldiers and tanks believed to be Russian returned to the streets of Simferopol for the vote; however, they were not posted near any of the polling stations.

;*;

In a small square near parliament, pro-Russian Crimeans painted banners to show their support for the (***)yes(***) vote.

;*;

The referendum offered voters two choices, in three different languages: either reunify Crimea with Russia, or restore the 1992 constitution, which would provide Crimea with greater autonomy. There was no option to maintain the status quo.

;*;Days before the vote, a large Russian flag flew on the grounds of the Crimean parliament.;*;Crimean Prime Minister Sergei Aksyonov speaks at a press conference on the referendum.;*;

Pro-Ukrainian rallies tended to be much smaller, sober affairs. They were largely overlooked by members of pro-Russian "self-defence" groups that attacked similar gatherings in other cities.

;*;Before the election, rival rallies were held in Simferopol. Pro-Russian rallies attracted far more people. Daylife ID:
c5f113999cef8287cc0addb38177a8fc
Photographer:
;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;
Image Source:
George Henton/Al Jazeera;*;George Henton/Al Jazeera;*;George Henton/Al Jazeera;*;George Henton/Al Jazeera;*;George Henton/Al Jazeera;*;George Henton/Al Jazeera;*;George Henton/Al Jazeera;*;George Henton/Al Jazeera;*;George Henton/Al Jazeera;*;George Henton/Al Jazeera
Gallery Source:
Daylife
Daylife Raw Data:
Crimea referendumhttp://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendumen-ussupport@newscred.comUntitled Site10Mon, 17 Mar 2014 07:15:03 GMT http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/b2493b80da7cc691756c40c0166b416a

At night, the words "??Crimean Spring"?? are projected onto a government building in Simferopol's Lenin Square before a victory party amid exit polls suggesting at least 90 percent voted in favour of joining Russia.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/b2493b80da7cc691756c40c0166b416aGeorge Henton/Al Jazeera

At night, the words "??Crimean Spring"?? are projected onto a government building in Simferopol's Lenin Square before a victory party amid exit polls suggesting at least 90 percent voted in favour of joining Russia.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/8775e2a82ecb8c6d34c4de4bf7c97591

Around Simferopol, support for joining Russia appeared to be widespread.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/8775e2a82ecb8c6d34c4de4bf7c97591George Henton/Al Jazeera

Around Simferopol, support for joining Russia appeared to be widespread.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/403edd8b73a82235e0016708cb9d82aa

Ballots were cast in transparent boxes.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/403edd8b73a82235e0016708cb9d82aaGeorge Henton/Al Jazeera

Ballots were cast in transparent boxes.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/f1b5edee5957f2a833f5642732b24734

Soldiers believed to be Russian returned to the streets of Simferopol for the vote; however, they were not posted near any of the polling stations.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/f1b5edee5957f2a833f5642732b24734George Henton/Al Jazeera

Soldiers believed to be Russian returned to the streets of Simferopol for the vote; however, they were not posted near any of the polling stations.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/d898f23b26efea97b855692774bff5ff

In a small square near parliament, pro-Russian Crimeans painted flags to show their support for the "yes"?? vote.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/d898f23b26efea97b855692774bff5ffGeorge Henton/Al Jazeera

In a small square near parliament, pro-Russian Crimeans painted flags to show their support for the "yes"?? vote.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/5135780a93970f624cba110cff5b46b5

The referendum offered voters two choices, in three different languages: either reunify Crimea with Russia, or ??restore the 1992 constitution, which would provide Crimea with greater autonomy??. There was no option to maintain the status quo.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/5135780a93970f624cba110cff5b46b5George Henton/Al Jazeera

The referendum offered voters two choices, in three different languages: either reunify Crimea with Russia, or ??restore the 1992 constitution, which would provide Crimea with greater autonomy??. There was no option to maintain the status quo.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/4ee6388fb1fc1a1b0d01c4683d732341

Days before the vote, a large Russian flag flew on the grounds of the Crimean parliament.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/4ee6388fb1fc1a1b0d01c4683d732341George Henton/Al Jazeera

Days before the vote, a large Russian flag flew on the grounds of the Crimean parliament.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/696c7697bc0dc47c4421524c7d41fc5d

Crimean Prime Minister Sergei Aksyonov speaks at a press conference on the referendum.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/696c7697bc0dc47c4421524c7d41fc5dGeorge Henton/Al Jazeera

Crimean Prime Minister Sergei Aksyonov speaks at a press conference on the referendum.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/638d1756a8dc529060ca36a889e20be8

Pro-Ukrainian rallies tended to be much smaller, sober affairs. They were largely overlooked by members of pro-Russian "??self-defence" groups that attacked similar gatherings in other cities.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/638d1756a8dc529060ca36a889e20be8George Henton/Al Jazeera

Pro-Ukrainian rallies tended to be much smaller, sober affairs. They were largely overlooked by members of pro-Russian "??self-defence" groups that attacked similar gatherings in other cities.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/74e1118d77d594363cb16d7412dc73e2

Before the election, rival rallies were held in Simferopol. Pro-Russian rallies attracted far more people.

http://aljazeera.galleries.newscred.com/gallery/Crimea_referendum/slideshow/no-caption/74e1118d77d594363cb16d7412dc73e2George Henton/Al Jazeera

Before the election, rival rallies were held in Simferopol. Pro-Russian rallies attracted far more people.



Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.