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In pictures: Going for gold in Mozambique
Prospectors perform backbreaking work to claw the tiny nuggets from the mud, often in tunnels far beneath the ground.
Last Modified: 20 Apr 2013 14:14
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Manica, Mozambique - They are washing the soil, day and night, hoping to reveal gold.

In this area of Mozambique, 70-80 percent of gold prospectors arrive illegally from the neighbouring country of Zimbabwe. The nuggets, which officially belong to the state, end up in the hands of Nigerian, Somalian, Zimbabwean, Israeli and Lebanese merchants.

The state is left with polluted ground and river water, unsuitable for drinking or watering, and with gold-diggers' damaged health.

The miners claw at the earth between 15 and 20 metres beneath the surface, in an extensive tunnel system.


Zsofia Palyi/TRANSTERRA Media
The gold diggers produce on average two to three grams of gold a day. On luckier days, they can even make 15-30 grams.


Zsofia Palyi/TRANSTERRA Media
A Lebanese merchant usually pays up to 1200 to 1300 meticals ($44-48) for one gram of gold.


Zsofia Palyi/TRANSTERRA Media
The diggers work on their own account, and after selling the gold they must give half of the money to the owner of the land.


Zsofia Palyi/TRANSTERRA Media
They build artificial bases and dams at the river bank where they wash the soil day and night to find the gold.


Zsofia Palyi/TRANSTERRA Media

They are digging at a depth of 15 to 20 metres beneath the surface, in an extensive tunnel system.



Zsofia Palyi/TRANSTERRA Media
Today's lunch is xima, an inexpensive and popular food of many African countries, made of cassava.


Zsofia Palyi/TRANSTERRA Media
Those who carry the sacks from the mine to the riverbank walk sometimes up to one kilometre with the bag on their head.


Zsofia Palyi/TRANSTERRA Media
They get 15 meticals (about $0.50) per sack they deliver to the river. On average, they deliver 48 to 50 sacks a day.



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images:
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captions:
The gold diggers produce on average two to three grams of gold a day. On luckier days, they can even make 15-30 grams.;*;A Lebanese merchant usually pays up to 1200 to 1300 meticals ($44-48) for one gram of gold.;*;The diggers work on their own account, and after selling the gold they must give half of the money to the owner of the land.;*;They build artificial bases and dams at the river bank where they wash the soil day and night to find the gold.;*;

They are digging at a depth of 15 to 20 metres beneath the surface, in an extensive tunnel system.

;*;Today\(***)s lunch is xima, an inexpensive and popular food of many African countries, made of cassava.;*;Those who carry the sacks from the mine to the riverbank walk sometimes up to one kilometre with the bag on their head.;*;They get 15 meticals (about $0.50) per sack they deliver to the river. On average, they deliver 48 to 50 sacks a day. Daylife ID:
1366105774212
Photographer:
Zsofia Palyi;*;Zsofia Palyi;*;Zsofia Palyi;*;Zsofia Palyi;*;Zsofia Palyi;*;Zsofia Palyi;*;Zsofia Palyi;*;Zsofia Palyi
Image Source:
TRANSTERRA Media;*;TRANSTERRA Media;*;TRANSTERRA Media;*;TRANSTERRA Media;*;TRANSTERRA Media;*;TRANSTERRA Media;*;TRANSTERRA Media;*;TRANSTERRA Media
Gallery Source:
Daylife
Daylife Raw Data:
Gold mining in Mozambiquehttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gold-mining-in-Mozambiqueen-usAl Jazeerafeedback@daylife.com10Tue, 16 Apr 2013 09:49:34 GMTWed, 17 Apr 2013 12:54:38 GMT http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gold-mining-in-Mozambique?image_id=0bxXf201umb8O

The gold diggers produce on average two to three grams of gold a day. On luckier days, they can even make 15-30 grams.

Wed, 17 Apr 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gold-mining-in-Mozambique?image_id=0bxXf201umb8OZsofia PalyiTRANSTERRA MediaAl Jazeera Upload Images

The gold diggers produce on average two to three grams of gold a day. On luckier days, they can even make 15-30 grams.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gold-mining-in-Mozambique?image_id=0bzNfxDgpjdkQ

A Lebanese merchant usually pays up to 1200 to 1300 meticals ($44-48) for one gram of gold.

Wed, 17 Apr 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gold-mining-in-Mozambique?image_id=0bzNfxDgpjdkQZsofia PalyiTRANSTERRA MediaAl Jazeera Upload Images

A Lebanese merchant usually pays up to 1200 to 1300 meticals ($44-48) for one gram of gold.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gold-mining-in-Mozambique?image_id=0aTn5O4f1G5NR

The diggers work on their own account, and after selling the gold they must give half of the money to the owner of the land.

Wed, 17 Apr 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gold-mining-in-Mozambique?image_id=0aTn5O4f1G5NRZsofia PalyiTRANSTERRA MediaAl Jazeera Upload Images

The diggers work on their own account, and after selling the gold they must give half of the money to the owner of the land.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gold-mining-in-Mozambique?image_id=067B0Qs51Beo0

They build artificial bases and dams at the river bank where they wash the soil day and night to find the gold.

Wed, 17 Apr 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gold-mining-in-Mozambique?image_id=067B0Qs51Beo0Zsofia PalyiTRANSTERRA MediaAl Jazeera Upload Images

They build artificial bases and dams at the river bank where they wash the soil day and night to find the gold.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gold-mining-in-Mozambique?image_id=03T80YxdWk4Hu

They are digging at a depth of 15 to 20 meters under the ground, in an extensive tunnel system.

Wed, 17 Apr 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gold-mining-in-Mozambique?image_id=03T80YxdWk4HuZsofia PalyiTRANSTERRA MediaAl Jazeera Upload Images

They are digging at a depth of 15 to 20 meters under the ground, in an extensive tunnel system.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gold-mining-in-Mozambique?image_id=0gDBfLld144tf

Today's lunch is xima, an inexpensive and popular food of many African countries, made of cassava.

Wed, 17 Apr 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gold-mining-in-Mozambique?image_id=0gDBfLld144tfZsofia PalyiTRANSTERRA MediaAl Jazeera Upload Images

Today's lunch is xima, an inexpensive and popular food of many African countries, made of cassava.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gold-mining-in-Mozambique?image_id=02SOcf7fILc0j

Those who carry the sacks from the mine to the riverbank walk sometimes up to one kilometre with the bag on their head.

Wed, 17 Apr 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gold-mining-in-Mozambique?image_id=02SOcf7fILc0jZsofia PalyiTRANSTERRA MediaAl Jazeera Upload Images

Those who carry the sacks from the mine to the riverbank walk sometimes up to one kilometre with the bag on their head.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gold-mining-in-Mozambique?image_id=0fR84Ei2RB8iO

They get 15 meticals (about $0.50) per sack they deliver to the river. On average, they deliver 48 to 50 sacks a day.

Wed, 17 Apr 2013 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Gold-mining-in-Mozambique?image_id=0fR84Ei2RB8iOZsofia PalyiTRANSTERRA MediaAl Jazeera Upload Images

They get 15 meticals (about $0.50) per sack they deliver to the river. On average, they deliver 48 to 50 sacks a day.



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