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In Pictures: Sport cracks down on doping
Sport's governing bodies are getting tougher on the widespread problem of doping.
Last Modified: 30 Mar 2013 13:07
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After years of denial, the Lance Armstrong sideshow finally unravelled when the American cyclist admitted to Oprah Winfrey that he had taken banned drugs before each of his seven Tour de France victories. Later, Danish cyclist Michael Rasmussen also admitted doping for 12 years [GETTY]
Five Kenyan marathon runners have been suspended for doping and six athletes, including former Olympic and three-times world hammer champion Ivan Tsikhan, above, will be disciplined for failing dope tests after their samples from the 2005 Helsinki world championships [EPA]
Three Russian swimmers were banned for doping, including European 100 metres backstroke short-course record holder Ksenia Moskvina, who was banned for six years after failing a second test in three months [EPA]
Former golfing world number one Vijay Singh is nervously awaiting an announcement by the PGA after his admission of using a deer antler spray containing a banned substance. The three-times major winner said he was unaware the spray contained a banned anabolic agent [GETTY]
Six leading Australian rugby league clubs are being investigated for possible doping violations after a year-long investigation. A report by the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Agency said the use of performance-enhancing drugs was widespread among professional and amateur athletes in Australia [GETTY]
In the US the Major League Baseball is investigating a newspaper report that several players had been supplied with human growth hormone, testosterone and anabolic steroids by a Florida anti-ageing clinic. New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez is one of the players named in the report and denies the allegations [EPA]
World football’s governing body FIFA have announced they will use biological passports in this year’s Confederations Cup and next year’s World Cup in Brazil. Peru midfielder Joel Sanchez, left, was banned for two years after failing a dope test in a World Cup qualifier against Bolivia last October [EPA]
Not to be left behind, the International Tennis Federation are introducing biological passports and intend to increase the number of blood tests. According to figures from the ITF only 21 out-of-competition tests were conducted in 2011 [GETTY]
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captions:
After years of denial, the Lance Armstrong sideshow finally unravelled when the American cyclist admitted to Oprah Winfrey that he had taken banned drugs before each of his seven Tour de France victories. Later, Danish cyclist Michael Rasmussen also admitted doping for 12 years [GETTY];*;Five Kenyan marathon runners have been suspended for doping and six athletes, including former Olympic and three-times world hammer champion Ivan Tsikhan, above, will be disciplined for failing dope tests after their samples from the 2005 Helsinki world championships [EPA];*;Three Russian swimmers were banned for doping, including European 100 metres backstroke short-course record holder Ksenia Moskvina, who was banned for six years after failing a second test in three months [EPA];*;Former golfing world number one Vijay Singh is nervously awaiting an announcement by the PGA after his admission of using a deer antler spray containing a banned substance. The three-times major winner said he was unaware the spray contained a banned anabolic agent [GETTY];*;Six leading Australian rugby league clubs are being investigated for possible doping violations after a year-long investigation. A report by the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Agency said the use of performance-enhancing drugs was widespread among professional and amateur athletes in Australia [GETTY] ;*;In the US the Major League Baseball is investigating a newspaper report that several players had been supplied with human growth hormone, testosterone and anabolic steroids by a Florida anti-ageing clinic. New York Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez is one of the players named in the report and denies the allegations [EPA];*;World football’s governing body FIFA have announced they will use biological passports in this year’s Confederations Cup and next year’s World Cup in Brazil. Peru midfielder Joel Sanchez, left, was banned for two years after failing a dope test in a World Cup qualifier against Bolivia last October [EPA] ;*;Not to be left behind, the International Tennis Federation are introducing biological passports and intend to increase the number of blood tests. According to figures from the ITF only 21 out-of-competition tests were conducted in 2011 [GETTY] Daylife ID:

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