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In Pictures
Malians await the end of the war
Bamako residents are largely grateful for the French military intervention in the country's north.
Last Modified: 27 Jan 2013 08:00

Bamako, Mali - Life on the streets of the Malian capital continues with surprising normality, even as fighting wages in the north of the country.

Yet many residents here believe their city came far too close to being captured by the armed groups that have occupied much of the north for nearly a year, and say that French military intervention beginning on January 11 helped secure the city.

As French and Malian troops advance further to the north - they recaptured the airport in Gao early on Saturday, and are likely to
push for Timbuktu this weekend - Al Jazeera spoke to people in Bamako to see how they have been affected by the conflict.


Yasmine Ryan/Al Jazeera
The Mali army has struggled to fight the armed groups that took much of the north of the country nearly a year ago. Mali has been reluctant to accept French and ECOWAS intervention, calling instead for support with training and arms. Many Western countries refused to sell the military weapons after a coup in March 2012.


Yasmine Ryan/Al Jazeera
A group of men selling sheep in central Bamako said the ongoing crisis has made their business much slower. Originally from the town of Nara, they fled the conflict for Bamako last year. "People don't have money anymore," said Cheikh Dicko, right. "We are relieved by the French intervention, but there are still lots of problems." 


Yasmine Ryan/Al Jazeera
Fatma Toure, right, fled Konna with her husband and children on January 10, when the armed group Ansar Dine briefly captured the town. The French sent in forces to help the Malian army recapture the north that same day. Fatma's cousin, Aichata Toure, left, lost a brother, who was among the soldiers killed by Ansar Dine in Konna


Yasmine Ryan/Al Jazeera
Malians go to Friday prayer in Bamako. Islam came to the region in the ninth century, and the towns of Timbuktu and Gao soon became influential centres of religious scholarship. Many Malians, however, view the harsh brand of Islam imposed on the north by armed groups as antithetical to their own religious practices and traditions.


Yasmine Ryan/Al Jazeera
Mohammed Agata fled Timbuktu for Bamako three weeks ago, to avoid getting caught in the crossfire. His hometown is one of the main bastions of armed groups. French and Malian troops are expected to try to retake Timbuktu this weekend.


Yasmine Ryan/Al Jazeera
Across Bamako, French and Malian flags can be seen waving side by side. "The French people came to save my country and I am happy about that," Kanati Aboubacar said as he stopped to buy a French flag by the side of the road. "The terrorists would have come to Bamako. They are bandits and drug dealers," he said.


Follow Yasmine Ryan on Twitter: @YasmineRyan


images:
/mritems/images/2013/1/26/2013126153642117426_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2013/1/26/2013126153642382292_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2013/1/26/2013126153642554312_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2013/1/26/2013126153642726205_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2013/1/26/2013126153642867640_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2013/1/26/201312615364354680_8.jpg
captions:
The Mali army has struggled to fight the armed groups that took much of the north of the country nearly a year ago. Mali has been reluctant to accept French and ECOWAS intervention, calling instead for support with training and arms. Many Western countries refused to sell the military weapons after a coup in March 2012.;*;A group of men selling sheep in central Bamako said the ongoing crisis has made their business much slower. Originally from the town of Nara, they fled the conflict for Bamako last year. "People don\(***)t have money anymore," said Cheikh Dicko, right. "We are relieved by the French intervention, but there are still lots of problems." ;*;Fatma Toure, right, fled Konna with her husband and children on January 10, when the armed group Ansar Dine briefly captured the town. The French sent in forces to help the Malian army recapture the north that same day. Fatma\(***)s cousin, Aichata Toure, left, lost a brother, who was among the soldiers killed by Ansar Dine in Konna;*;Malians go to Friday prayer in Bamako. Islam came to the region in the ninth century, and the towns of Timbuktu and Gao soon became influential centres of religious scholarship. Many Malians, however, view the harsh brand of Islam imposed on the north by armed groups as antithetical to their own religious practices and traditions.;*;Mohammed Agata fled Timbuktu for Bamako three weeks ago, to avoid getting caught in the crossfire. His hometown is one of the main bastions of armed groups. French and Malian troops are expected to try to retake Timbuktu this weekend.;*;Across Bamako, French and Malian flags can be seen waving side by side. "The French people came to save my country and I am happy about that," Kanati Aboubacar said as he stopped to buy a French flag by the side of the road. "The terrorists would have come to Bamako. They are bandits and drug dealers," he said. Daylife ID:
1359204012449
Photographer:
Yasmine Ryan;*;Yasmine Ryan;*;Yasmine Ryan;*;Yasmine Ryan;*;Yasmine Ryan;*;Yasmine Ryan
Image Source:
Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera
Gallery Source:
Daylife
Daylife Raw Data:
Malians await the end of the warhttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Malianswaitfortheendofwaren-usAl Jazeerafeedback@daylife.com10Sat, 26 Jan 2013 12:40:13 GMTSun, 27 Jan 2013 07:55:11 GMT http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Malianswaitfortheendofwar?image_id=0df86tF9706lB

The Mali army has struggled to fight the armed groups that took much of the north of the country nearly a year ago. Mali has been reluctant to accept French and ECOWAS intervention, calling instead for support with training and arms. Many Western countries refused to sell the military weapons after a coup in March 2012.

Sat, 26 Jan 2013 12:41:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Malianswaitfortheendofwar?image_id=0df86tF9706lBYasmine RyanAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

The Mali army has struggled to fight the armed groups that took much of the north of the country nearly a year ago. Mali has been reluctant to accept French and ECOWAS intervention, calling instead for support with training and arms. Many Western countries refused to sell the military weapons after a coup in March 2012.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Malianswaitfortheendofwar?image_id=09p97yxcvXgIS

A group of men selling sheep in central Bamako said the ongoing crisis has made their business much slower. Originally from the town of Nara, they fled the conflict for Bamako last year. "People don't have money anymore," said Cheikh Dicko, right. "We are relieved by the French intervention, but there are still lots of problems." 

Sat, 26 Jan 2013 12:41:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Malianswaitfortheendofwar?image_id=09p97yxcvXgISYasmine RyanAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

A group of men selling sheep in central Bamako said the ongoing crisis has made their business much slower. Originally from the town of Nara, they fled the conflict for Bamako last year. "People don't have money anymore," said Cheikh Dicko, right. "We are relieved by the French intervention, but there are still lots of problems." 

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Malianswaitfortheendofwar?image_id=00iF7Hqaqx5xo

Fatma Toure, right, fled Konna with her husband and children on January 10, when the armed group Ansar Dine briefly captured the town. The French sent in forces to help the Malian army recapture the north that same day. Fatma's cousin, Aichata Toure, left, lost a brother, who was among the soldiers killed by Ansar Dine in Konna

Sat, 26 Jan 2013 12:41:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Malianswaitfortheendofwar?image_id=00iF7Hqaqx5xoYasmine RyanAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

Fatma Toure, right, fled Konna with her husband and children on January 10, when the armed group Ansar Dine briefly captured the town. The French sent in forces to help the Malian army recapture the north that same day. Fatma's cousin, Aichata Toure, left, lost a brother, who was among the soldiers killed by Ansar Dine in Konna

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Malianswaitfortheendofwar?image_id=0fS74sGdcO9nh

Malians go to Friday prayer in Bamako. Islam came to the region in the ninth century, and the towns of Timbuktu and Gao soon became influential centres of religious scholarship. Many Malians, however, view the harsh brand of Islam imposed on the north by armed groups as antithetical to their own religious practices and traditions.

Sat, 26 Jan 2013 12:41:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Malianswaitfortheendofwar?image_id=0fS74sGdcO9nhYasmine RyanAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

Malians go to Friday prayer in Bamako. Islam came to the region in the ninth century, and the towns of Timbuktu and Gao soon became influential centres of religious scholarship. Many Malians, however, view the harsh brand of Islam imposed on the north by armed groups as antithetical to their own religious practices and traditions.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Malianswaitfortheendofwar?image_id=02dH4693YMbG8Mohammed Agata fled Timbuktu for Bamako three weeks ago, to avoid getting caught in the crossfire. His hometown is one of the main bastions of armed groups. French and Malian troops are expected to try to retake Timbuktu this weekend.
Sat, 26 Jan 2013 12:41:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Malianswaitfortheendofwar?image_id=02dH4693YMbG8Yasmine RyanAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload ImagesMohammed Agata fled Timbuktu for Bamako three weeks ago, to avoid getting caught in the crossfire. His hometown is one of the main bastions of armed groups. French and Malian troops are expected to try to retake Timbuktu this weekend.
http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Malianswaitfortheendofwar?image_id=0a3hbF99fP9Eh

Across Bamako, French and Malian flags can be seen waving side by side. "The French people came to save my country and I am happy about that," Kanati Aboubacar said as he stopped to buy a French flag by the side of the road. "The terrorists would have come to Bamako. They are bandits and drug dealers," he said.

Sat, 26 Jan 2013 14:31:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Malianswaitfortheendofwar?image_id=0a3hbF99fP9EhYasmine RyanAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

Across Bamako, French and Malian flags can be seen waving side by side. "The French people came to save my country and I am happy about that," Kanati Aboubacar said as he stopped to buy a French flag by the side of the road. "The terrorists would have come to Bamako. They are bandits and drug dealers," he said.



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