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In Pictures
Bahrain: a timeline in pictures
A depiction of major events in the Gulf kingdom since pro-democracy protests broke out.
Last Modified: 24 Mar 2012 07:14

The tiny Gulf kingdom of Bahrain has been in upheaval since pro-democracy protests first erupted in February last year.

Persistent demonstrations, brutal security crackdowns and unremitting violence have followed since then.

Here is a look at the key moments of the unresolved conflict engulfing the kingdom:


/EPA
The calm was short-lived, though. More than 1,000 police officers, armed with shotguns and tear gas, charged into the square in the early morning hours. More than 200 people were injured, and three were killed, two of them by shotgun blasts at close range.All 18 members parliament from Al Wefaq, the largest opposition political society, resigned in protest.


/EPA
Another man, Fadhel al-Matrook, was shot and killed by police during Mushaima's funeral. Thousands of angry demonstrators marched to Pearl Roundabout after Mushaima's funeral, and the king issued a decree allowing them to remain. Bahrain's main trade union began organising a general strike for February 17.


/EPA
Low-level clashes would continue for two days, until February 19, when the king withdrew security forces from Manama and protesters returned to Pearl Roundabout.More than 100,000 people came out on February 22 for a massive rally to honor the victims of the previous week's unrest. Many of them camped out in Pearl Roundabout overnight, and would remain in the square for weeks to come.


/EPA
Tensions would flare again in mid-March, when protesters tried to occupy the area outside Bahrain Financial Harbour, a key business hub downtown.They were violently dispersed by police, who then moved westward and tear-gassed the protesters encamped in Pearl Roundabout.


/AFP
Troops from Saudi Arabia, Qatar and other Gulf countries rolled into Bahrain on March 14; the king said they were invited to "help defuse the tension in Bahrain."Two days later, Bahraini security forces launched a massive operation to clear Pearl Roundabout, using helicopters and armoured vehicles to clear protesters while setting fire to their tents. Police also blocked access to hospitals; some protesters later reported officers conducting arrests inside medical facilities.


/EPA
Two days later, the Bahraini government knocked down the iconic statue in the centre of Pearl Roundabout. Armoured vehicles would remain deployed around the roundabout for months, preventing protesters from returning.


/EPA
Youth activists organised a series of rallies in villages across Bahrain. Formal opposition groups like Al Wefaq decided not to participate.Villagers in Bilad al-Qadeem held a funeral for Hani Abdul Aziz, one of two people killed by police in a 24-hour period. Abdul Aziz was reportedly cornered by police inside a house, shot repeatedly, and left to bleed to death.


/EPA
Dozens of doctors went missing over a period of several weeks, according to a report issued by Physicians for Human Rights.The group found that many of the doctors disappeared after being interrogated at Salmaniya Medical Complex, the largest hospital in Bahrain. Medical workers were often the target of abuse during the protests in February and March: Ambulances were prevented from reaching injured protesters, and paramedics disappeared for days at a time.


/EPA
A national dialogue organised by King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa launched on July 2, with more than 300 participants, most of them government supporters.Some opposition groups boycotted the dialogue entirely. Al Wefaq had only 5 of the 300 seats, and it dropped out after only a few weeks, calling the talks a farce.


/
The Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry, the government body created to study the unrest, released its official report on November 23. It accused the government of widespread abuses, blaming security forces for widespread torture and arbitrary detentions.The report did little to calm the streets, though; violent clashes erupted in A'ali on November 24 after the funeral for a man reportedly killed by police.


Hasan Jamali/AP
March 20: The National Commission will release its follow up report to the king about implementing the reforms recommended after the previous report found widespread abuse.



images:
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captions:
The calm was short-lived, though. More than 1,000 police officers, armed with shotguns and tear gas, charged into the square in the early morning hours. More than 200 people were injured, and three were killed, two of them by shotgun blasts at close range.All 18 members parliament from Al Wefaq, the largest opposition political society, resigned in protest.;*;Another man, Fadhel al-Matrook, was shot and killed by police during Mushaima\(***)s funeral. Thousands of angry demonstrators marched to Pearl Roundabout after Mushaima\(***)s funeral, and the king issued a decree allowing them to remain. Bahrain\(***)s main trade union began organising a general strike for February 17.;*;Low-level clashes would continue for two days, until February 19, when the king withdrew security forces from Manama and protesters returned to Pearl Roundabout.More than 100,000 people came out on February 22 for a massive rally to honor the victims of the previous week\(***)s unrest. Many of them camped out in Pearl Roundabout overnight, and would remain in the square for weeks to come.;*;Tensions would flare again in mid-March, when protesters tried to occupy the area outside Bahrain Financial Harbour, a key business hub downtown.They were violently dispersed by police, who then moved westward and tear-gassed the protesters encamped in Pearl Roundabout.;*;Troops from Saudi Arabia, Qatar and other Gulf countries rolled into Bahrain on March 14; the king said they were invited to "help defuse the tension in Bahrain."Two days later, Bahraini security forces launched a massive operation to clear Pearl Roundabout, using helicopters and armoured vehicles to clear protesters while setting fire to their tents. Police also blocked access to hospitals; some protesters later reported officers conducting arrests inside medical facilities.;*;Two days later, the Bahraini government knocked down the iconic statue in the centre of Pearl Roundabout. Armoured vehicles would remain deployed around the roundabout for months, preventing protesters from returning.;*;Youth activists organised a series of rallies in villages across Bahrain. Formal opposition groups like Al Wefaq decided not to participate.Villagers in Bilad al-Qadeem held a funeral for Hani Abdul Aziz, one of two people killed by police in a 24-hour period. Abdul Aziz was reportedly cornered by police inside a house, shot repeatedly, and left to bleed to death.;*;Dozens of doctors went missing over a period of several weeks, according to a report issued by Physicians for Human Rights.The group found that many of the doctors disappeared after being interrogated at Salmaniya Medical Complex, the largest hospital in Bahrain. Medical workers were often the target of abuse during the protests in February and March: Ambulances were prevented from reaching injured protesters, and paramedics disappeared for days at a time.;*;A national dialogue organised by King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa launched on July 2, with more than 300 participants, most of them government supporters.Some opposition groups boycotted the dialogue entirely. Al Wefaq had only 5 of the 300 seats, and it dropped out after only a few weeks, calling the talks a farce.;*;The Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry, the government body created to study the unrest, released its official report on November 23. It accused the government of widespread abuses, blaming security forces for widespread torture and arbitrary detentions.The report did little to calm the streets, though; violent clashes erupted in A\(***)ali on November 24 after the funeral for a man reportedly killed by police.;*;March 20: The National Commission will release its follow up report to the king about implementing the reforms recommended after the previous report found widespread abuse. Daylife ID:
1329146185219
Photographer:
;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;;*;Hasan Jamali
Image Source:
EPA;*;EPA;*;EPA;*;EPA;*;AFP;*;EPA;*;EPA;*;EPA;*;EPA;*;;*;AP
Gallery Source:
Daylife
Daylife Raw Data:
Bahrain: One year laterhttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_laterA timeline, in pictures, of a year of unrest in Bahrain.en-usAl Jazeerafeedback@daylife.com10Mon, 13 Feb 2012 15:16:24 GMTTue, 20 Mar 2012 08:13:56 GMTFebruary 17: Police clear the roundabouthttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=0elXb1i5pvfVy

The calm was short-lived, though. More than 1,000 police officers, armed with shotguns and tear gas, charged into the square in the early morning hours. More than 200 people were injured, and three were killed, two of them by shotgun blasts at close range.

All 18 members parliament from Al Wefaq, the largest opposition political society, resigned in protest.

Mon, 13 Feb 2012 15:40:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=0elXb1i5pvfVyEPAAl Jazeera Upload Images

The calm was short-lived, though. More than 1,000 police officers, armed with shotguns and tear gas, charged into the square in the early morning hours. More than 200 people were injured, and three were killed, two of them by shotgun blasts at close range.

All 18 members parliament from Al Wefaq, the largest opposition political society, resigned in protest.

February 17: Police clear the roundabout
February 15: The march to Pearl Roundabouthttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=0cQd6Do7xv8me

Another man, Fadhel al-Matrook, was shot and killed by police during Mushaima's funeral. Thousands of angry demonstrators marched to Pearl Roundabout after Mushaima's funeral, and the king issued a decree allowing them to remain. Bahrain's main trade union began organising a general strike for February 17.

Mon, 13 Feb 2012 15:40:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=0cQd6Do7xv8meEPAAl Jazeera Upload Images

Another man, Fadhel al-Matrook, was shot and killed by police during Mushaima's funeral. Thousands of angry demonstrators marched to Pearl Roundabout after Mushaima's funeral, and the king issued a decree allowing them to remain. Bahrain's main trade union began organising a general strike for February 17.

February 15: The march to Pearl Roundabout
February 22: The largest anti-government rallyhttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=0bdp2lUcxq1V9

Low-level clashes would continue for two days, until February 19, when the king withdrew security forces from Manama and protesters returned to Pearl Roundabout.

More than 100,000 people came out on February 22 for a massive rally to honor the victims of the previous week's unrest. Many of them camped out in Pearl Roundabout overnight, and would remain in the square for weeks to come.

Mon, 13 Feb 2012 15:40:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=0bdp2lUcxq1V9EPAAl Jazeera Upload Images

Low-level clashes would continue for two days, until February 19, when the king withdrew security forces from Manama and protesters returned to Pearl Roundabout.

More than 100,000 people came out on February 22 for a massive rally to honor the victims of the previous week's unrest. Many of them camped out in Pearl Roundabout overnight, and would remain in the square for weeks to come.

February 22: The largest anti-government rally
March 13: Clashes resumehttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=07fR9Vb4a179L

Tensions would flare again in mid-March, when protesters tried to occupy the area outside Bahrain Financial Harbour, a key business hub downtown.

They were violently dispersed by police, who then moved westward and tear-gassed the protesters encamped in Pearl Roundabout.

Mon, 13 Feb 2012 15:41:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=07fR9Vb4a179LEPAAl Jazeera Upload Images

Tensions would flare again in mid-March, when protesters tried to occupy the area outside Bahrain Financial Harbour, a key business hub downtown.

They were violently dispersed by police, who then moved westward and tear-gassed the protesters encamped in Pearl Roundabout.

March 13: Clashes resume
March 16: The army clears Pearl Roundabouthttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=0gVnac6d1H5cT

Troops from Saudi Arabia, Qatar and other Gulf countries rolled into Bahrain on March 14; the king said they were invited to "help defuse the tension in Bahrain."

Two days later, Bahraini security forces launched a massive operation to clear Pearl Roundabout, using helicopters and armoured vehicles to clear protesters while setting fire to their tents. Police also blocked access to hospitals; some protesters later reported officers conducting arrests inside medical facilities.

Mon, 13 Feb 2012 15:39:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=0gVnac6d1H5cTAFPAl Jazeera Upload Images

Troops from Saudi Arabia, Qatar and other Gulf countries rolled into Bahrain on March 14; the king said they were invited to "help defuse the tension in Bahrain."

Two days later, Bahraini security forces launched a massive operation to clear Pearl Roundabout, using helicopters and armoured vehicles to clear protesters while setting fire to their tents. Police also blocked access to hospitals; some protesters later reported officers conducting arrests inside medical facilities.

March 16: The army clears Pearl Roundabout
March 18: Pearl Roundabout is destroyedhttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=06b70Jz2C7bOQ

Two days later, the Bahraini government knocked down the iconic statue in the centre of Pearl Roundabout. Armoured vehicles would remain deployed around the roundabout for months, preventing protesters from returning.

Mon, 13 Feb 2012 15:42:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=06b70Jz2C7bOQEPAAl Jazeera Upload Images

Two days later, the Bahraini government knocked down the iconic statue in the centre of Pearl Roundabout. Armoured vehicles would remain deployed around the roundabout for months, preventing protesters from returning.

March 18: Pearl Roundabout is destroyed
March 25: The "day of rage"http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=03Nf2cO6wJ8HR

Youth activists organised a series of rallies in villages across Bahrain. Formal opposition groups like Al Wefaq decided not to participate.

Villagers in Bilad al-Qadeem held a funeral for Hani Abdul Aziz, one of two people killed by police in a 24-hour period. Abdul Aziz was reportedly cornered by police inside a house, shot repeatedly, and left to bleed to death.

Mon, 13 Feb 2012 15:42:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=03Nf2cO6wJ8HREPAAl Jazeera Upload Images

Youth activists organised a series of rallies in villages across Bahrain. Formal opposition groups like Al Wefaq decided not to participate.

Villagers in Bilad al-Qadeem held a funeral for Hani Abdul Aziz, one of two people killed by police in a 24-hour period. Abdul Aziz was reportedly cornered by police inside a house, shot repeatedly, and left to bleed to death.

March 25: The "day of rage"
April 22: Doctors disappearing, rights group sayshttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=06ndbIP2WE70Q

Dozens of doctors went missing over a period of several weeks, according to a report issued by Physicians for Human Rights.

The group found that many of the doctors disappeared after being interrogated at Salmaniya Medical Complex, the largest hospital in Bahrain. Medical workers were often the target of abuse during the protests in February and March: Ambulances were prevented from reaching injured protesters, and paramedics disappeared for days at a time.

Mon, 13 Feb 2012 15:40:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=06ndbIP2WE70QEPAAl Jazeera Upload Images

Dozens of doctors went missing over a period of several weeks, according to a report issued by Physicians for Human Rights.

The group found that many of the doctors disappeared after being interrogated at Salmaniya Medical Complex, the largest hospital in Bahrain. Medical workers were often the target of abuse during the protests in February and March: Ambulances were prevented from reaching injured protesters, and paramedics disappeared for days at a time.

April 22: Doctors disappearing, rights group says
July 2: National Dialogue beginshttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=0dQD8qV4739K1

A national dialogue organised by King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa launched on July 2, with more than 300 participants, most of them government supporters.

Some opposition groups boycotted the dialogue entirely. Al Wefaq had only 5 of the 300 seats, and it dropped out after only a few weeks, calling the talks a farce.

Mon, 13 Feb 2012 15:42:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=0dQD8qV4739K1EPAAl Jazeera Upload Images

A national dialogue organised by King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa launched on July 2, with more than 300 participants, most of them government supporters.

Some opposition groups boycotted the dialogue entirely. Al Wefaq had only 5 of the 300 seats, and it dropped out after only a few weeks, calling the talks a farce.

July 2: National Dialogue begins
November 24: BICI report and more violencehttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=00u3fNC0qsbPB

The Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry, the government body created to study the unrest, released its official report on November 23. It accused the government of widespread abuses, blaming security forces for widespread torture and arbitrary detentions.

The report did little to calm the streets, though; violent clashes erupted in A'ali on November 24 after the funeral for a man reportedly killed by police.

Mon, 13 Feb 2012 15:43:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=00u3fNC0qsbPBAl Jazeera Upload Images

The Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry, the government body created to study the unrest, released its official report on November 23. It accused the government of widespread abuses, blaming security forces for widespread torture and arbitrary detentions.

The report did little to calm the streets, though; violent clashes erupted in A'ali on November 24 after the funeral for a man reportedly killed by police.

November 24: BICI report and more violence
March 20: Follow up report http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=0du781peTg0Op

March 20: The National Commission will release its follow up report to the king about implementing the reforms recommended after the previous report found widespread abuse.

Thu, 15 Mar 2012 07:36:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/bahrain_one_year_later?image_id=0du781peTg0OpHasan JamaliAPAP Photo

March 20: The National Commission will release its follow up report to the king about implementing the reforms recommended after the previous report found widespread abuse.

March 20: Follow up report


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