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In Pictures: World Toilet Day

With 2.5bn people lacking sanitary conditions, the threat of disease highlighted by Toilet Day is no laughing matter.
Last Modified: 19 Nov 2012 12:18

About 2.5bn people around the world lack access to safe, affordable sanitation, and some 1bn are forced to defecate openly in public places, according to the United Nations.

World Toilet Day on Monday raises awareness of the serious nature of this problem.

More than 2.7m people die each year because of a lack of sanitation - most under age five, Catarina de Albuquerque, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the human right to safe drinking water and sanitation, told reporters in Geneva last week.

"Access to sanitation facilities around the world, more than any other service, provides a window into the vast difference between the 'haves' and the 'have-nots'," said de Albuquerque.

One in three women worldwide have no access to a decent toilet, increasing their risk of illness, harassment and even attack, says the NGO WaterAid.

People living in impoverished conditions suffer the most from unsanitary conditions and a lack of proper toilet facilities. Disease such as cholera, typhoid, and hepatitis A are easily spread when people defecate in the open, says the World Health Organization.

An estimated 80 per cent of untreated wastewater in developing countries flows back into lakes, oceans, and drinking water sources. This is a major cause of diarrhoea among children.  

The scale of the problem is not being adequately addressed, health officials say. At current rates of progress it will be 350 years before everyone in Sub-Saharan Africa gets access to safe sanitation, says WaterAid.

"With around 2,000 children under the age of five dying every day from diarrhoea, brought about through unsafe sanitation, dirty water and poor hygiene, we need to step up the global efforts to tackle what is the second biggest killer of children worldwide," Barbara Frost, WaterAids's chief executive, told Al Jazeera.


Dieter Telemans/WaterAid
Waste collector, Varghese, holds a handful of compost at the compost site, at Chinnavilai village, India.It is estimated that around 2.5bn people around the world lack access to safe sanitation.


Layton Thompson/WaterAid
Elifa Mwaungulu, building a latrine slab, in Chikompulazi village, Malawi.People living in impoverished conditions suffer the most from unsanitary conditions.


Layton Thompson/WaterAid
Lines Napolo, in front of her latrine, Mwenyekondo, Malawi.


/WaterAid
The scale of the problem is not being adequately addressed.With the actual progress, it will take 350 years before everyone in Sub-Saharan Africa gets access to safe sanitation.


Eva-Lotta Jansson/WaterAid
An estimated 80 per cent of untreated waste-water in developing countries flows back into lakes, oceans, and drinking water source.


GMB Akash/WaterAid
One of three women have no access to decent toilet, increasing their risks of illness.


Benedicte Desrus/WaterAid
In Kifumbira slum, Uganda,  there are only four toilets for every 2,000 people, and until WaterAid partner with AEE (African Evangelistic Enterprises) built a new block, the only toilets consisted of holes overflowing with faeces and maggots.


Benedicte Desrus/WaterAid
A child plays in the slum of Kifumbira, Uganda, a maze of rubbish, unplanned housing, mud and human waste which flows through makeshift drains.



images:
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captions:
Waste collector, Varghese, holds a handful of compost at the compost site, at Chinnavilai village, India.It is estimated that around 2.5bn people around the world lack access to safe sanitation. ;*;Elifa Mwaungulu, building a latrine slab, in Chikompulazi village, Malawi.People living in impoverished conditions suffer the most from unsanitary conditions. ;*;Lines Napolo, in front of her latrine, Mwenyekondo, Malawi.;*;The scale of the problem is not being adequately addressed.With the actual progress, it will take 350 years before everyone in Sub-Saharan Africa gets access to safe sanitation. ;*;An estimated 80 per cent of untreated waste-water in developing countries flows back into lakes, oceans, and drinking water source.;*;One of three women have no access to decent toilet, increasing their risks of illness. ;*;In Kifumbira slum, Uganda,  there are only four toilets for every 2,000 people, and until WaterAid partner with AEE (African Evangelistic Enterprises) built a new block, the only toilets consisted of holes overflowing with faeces and maggots. ;*;A child plays in the slum of Kifumbira, Uganda, a maze of rubbish, unplanned housing, mud and human waste which flows through makeshift drains. Daylife ID:
1353227752954
Photographer:
Dieter Telemans;*;Layton Thompson;*;Layton Thompson;*;;*;Eva-Lotta Jansson;*;GMB Akash;*;Benedicte Desrus;*;Benedicte Desrus
Image Source:
WaterAid;*;WaterAid;*;WaterAid;*;WaterAid;*;WaterAid;*;WaterAid;*;WaterAid;*;WaterAid
Gallery Source:
Daylife
Daylife Raw Data:
Toilet day http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1353227752954en-usAl Jazeerafeedback@daylife.com10Sun, 18 Nov 2012 08:35:53 GMTSun, 18 Nov 2012 10:11:32 GMT http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1353227752954?image_id=063Y9eX0OagIoWaste collector, Varghese, holds a handful of compost at the compost site, at Chinnavilai village, India.It is estimated that around 2.5bn people around the world lack access to safe sanitation. Mon, 19 Nov 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1353227752954?image_id=063Y9eX0OagIoDieter TelemansWaterAidAl Jazeera Upload ImagesWaste collector, Varghese, holds a handful of compost at the compost site, at Chinnavilai village, India.It is estimated that around 2.5bn people around the world lack access to safe sanitation. http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1353227752954?image_id=0fwbeVYeOF7s0Elifa Mwaungulu, building a latrine slab, in Chikompulazi village, Malawi.People living in impoverished conditions suffer the most from unsanitary conditions. Mon, 19 Nov 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1353227752954?image_id=0fwbeVYeOF7s0Layton ThompsonWaterAidAl Jazeera Upload ImagesElifa Mwaungulu, building a latrine slab, in Chikompulazi village, Malawi.People living in impoverished conditions suffer the most from unsanitary conditions. http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1353227752954?image_id=05G6fji2KRffqLines Napolo, in front of her latrine, Mwenyekondo, Malawi.Mon, 19 Nov 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1353227752954?image_id=05G6fji2KRffqLayton ThompsonWaterAidAl Jazeera Upload ImagesLines Napolo, in front of her latrine, Mwenyekondo, Malawi. http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1353227752954?image_id=077Z6bG8ZydvrThe scale of the problem is not being adequately addressed.With the actual progress, it will take 350 years before everyone in Sub-Saharan Africa gets access to safe sanitation. Mon, 19 Nov 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1353227752954?image_id=077Z6bG8ZydvrWaterAidAl Jazeera Upload ImagesThe scale of the problem is not being adequately addressed.With the actual progress, it will take 350 years before everyone in Sub-Saharan Africa gets access to safe sanitation. http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1353227752954?image_id=0cxhcY6bRGfr2An estimated 80 per cent of untreated waste-water in developing countries flows back into lakes, oceans, and drinking water source.Mon, 19 Nov 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1353227752954?image_id=0cxhcY6bRGfr2Eva-Lotta JanssonWaterAidAl Jazeera Upload ImagesAn estimated 80 per cent of untreated waste-water in developing countries flows back into lakes, oceans, and drinking water source. http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1353227752954?image_id=09u1fQG80Bc64One of three women have no access to decent toilet, increasing their risks of illness. Mon, 19 Nov 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1353227752954?image_id=09u1fQG80Bc64GMB AkashWaterAidAl Jazeera Upload ImagesOne of three women have no access to decent toilet, increasing their risks of illness. http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1353227752954?image_id=03LAfp7f7q0ku

In Kifumbira slum, Uganda,  there are only four toilets for every 2,000 people, and until WaterAid partner with AEE (African Evangelistic Enterprises) built a new block, the only toilets consisted of holes overflowing with faeces and maggots.

Mon, 19 Nov 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1353227752954?image_id=03LAfp7f7q0kuBenedicte DesrusWaterAidAl Jazeera Upload Images

In Kifumbira slum, Uganda,  there are only four toilets for every 2,000 people, and until WaterAid partner with AEE (African Evangelistic Enterprises) built a new block, the only toilets consisted of holes overflowing with faeces and maggots.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1353227752954?image_id=00l354k4zq8JB

A child plays in the slum of Kifumbira, Uganda, a maze of rubbish, unplanned housing, mud and human waste which flows through makeshift drains.

Mon, 19 Nov 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/1353227752954?image_id=00l354k4zq8JBBenedicte DesrusWaterAidAl Jazeera Upload Images

A child plays in the slum of Kifumbira, Uganda, a maze of rubbish, unplanned housing, mud and human waste which flows through makeshift drains.



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