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In Pictures
Somalia in Transition
Somalia has a new constitution, parliament and president, raising hopes it will finally shed its "failed state" title.
Last Modified: 24 Sep 2012 12:16

In recent months, African Union, Kenyan, and Ethiopian troops, alongside a coalition of Somali militia, have "liberated" many major towns from the al-Shabab militia.

Al-Shabab has shown little resistance, strategically abandoning its former bases and training camps, and adopting guerrilla tactics in the face of larger and better-equipped armies. Though many towns have been cleared of the militants, the bush in between remains insecure. 

Mired by the death of key leaders, infighting, revenue losses, and fleeing of foreign fighters, there is no doubt that al-Shabab has weakened. Most fighters have retreated to the port city of Kismayo, the Islamists' last bastion and financial centre.

But prophesying the end of the fighters underestimates their agility. Al-Shabab still wreaks havoc using land mines, car bombs, and improvised explosive devices.  

And the expulsion of the group from Kismayo could create a dangerous a power vacuum, testing the uneasy alliance between various Somali factions.

Places such as Ras Kamboni and Baidoa are microcosms of the largely unseen Somalia outside of Mogadishu. Observers say it is regions such as these that will test the transition from failed state to stable democracy.

Despite the hardship Somalis face outside Mogadishu, the disappearance of al-Shabab from cities and towns is a sign of hope after decades of despair. 



Roopa Gogineni/Al Jazeera
A soldier listens to the evening news. Somali militiamen and the Kenyan military took control of Ras Kamboni town last year from al-Shabab.


Roopa Gogineni/Al Jazeera
The port at Ras Kamboni receives boats from Kismayo, a port city still under the control of al-Shabab.


Roopa Gogineni/Al Jazeera
A Ras Kamboni fighter retrieves water from a borehole. Residents of Ras Kamboni have dangerously little access to clean drinking water.


Roopa Gogineni/Al Jazeera
Ras Kamboni soldiers drink water at one of few boreholes in the area.


Roopa Gogineni/Al Jazeera
A patient waits to be seen in the newly upgraded WHO clinic, which previously served as al-Shabab's headquarters.


Roopa Gogineni/Al Jazeera
A patient rests after his operation. Before the clinic opened, those in need of medical care traveled to Kismayo, Mogadishu, or into Kenya for treatment.


Roopa Gogineni /Al Jazeera
Young boys play football in a stadium in Baidoa. Before the city was liberated in February, al-Shabab used to gather residents here to view public amputations.


Roopa Gogineni /Al Jazeera
A Ras Kamboni Brigade soldier on patrol in the seaside town of Bur Gaabo. The pro-government militia, fighting alongside the Kenyan military, now approaches Kismayo from the south.


Roopa Gogineni /Al Jazeera
Somali soldiers walk past stacks of charcoal. The UN embargo on charcoal aimed to stifle one of al-Shabab's main sources of revenue. The stockpile in Bur Gaabo is estimated to be worth several millions of dollars.


Roopa Gogineni/Al Jazeera
A UN embargo on charcoal exports from Somalia have left large stockpiles in Burgabo.



images:
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captions:
A soldier listens to the evening news. Somali militiamen and the Kenyan military took control of Ras Kamboni town last year from al-Shabab.;*;The port at Ras Kamboni receives boats from Kismayo, a port city still under the control of al-Shabab.;*;A Ras Kamboni fighter retrieves water from a borehole. Residents of Ras Kamboni have dangerously little access to clean drinking water.;*;Ras Kamboni soldiers drink water at one of few boreholes in the area.;*;A patient waits to be seen in the newly upgraded WHO clinic, which previously served as al-Shabab\(***)s headquarters. ;*;A patient rests after his operation. Before the clinic opened, those in need of medical care traveled to Kismayo, Mogadishu, or into Kenya for treatment.;*;Young boys play football in a stadium in Baidoa. Before the city was liberated in February, al-Shabab used to gather residents here to view public amputations. ;*;A Ras Kamboni Brigade soldier on patrol in the seaside town of Bur Gaabo. The pro-government militia, fighting alongside the Kenyan military, now approaches Kismayo from the south. ;*;Somali soldiers walk past stacks of charcoal. The UN embargo on charcoal aimed to stifle one of al-Shabab\(***)s main sources of revenue. The stockpile in Bur Gaabo is estimated to be worth several millions of dollars.;*;A UN embargo on charcoal exports from Somalia have left large stockpiles in Burgabo. Daylife ID:
1347281904288
Photographer:
Roopa Gogineni;*;Roopa Gogineni;*;Roopa Gogineni;*;Roopa Gogineni;*;Roopa Gogineni;*;Roopa Gogineni;*;Roopa Gogineni ;*;Roopa Gogineni ;*;Roopa Gogineni ;*;Roopa Gogineni
Image Source:
Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera
Gallery Source:
Daylife
Daylife Raw Data:
Ras Kambonihttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kambonien-usAl Jazeerafeedback@daylife.com10Mon, 10 Sep 2012 12:59:26 GMTMon, 10 Sep 2012 14:43:42 GMT http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=06QmbS52Dp8lr

A soldier listens to the evening news. Somali militiamen and the Kenyan military took control of Ras Kamboni town last year from al-Shabab.

Mon, 10 Sep 2012 12:48:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=06QmbS52Dp8lrRoopa GogineniAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

A soldier listens to the evening news. Somali militiamen and the Kenyan military took control of Ras Kamboni town last year from al-Shabab.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=05gGdA3dg4aqS

The port at Ras Kamboni receives boats from Kismayo, a port city still under the control of al-Shabab.

Mon, 10 Sep 2012 12:49:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=05gGdA3dg4aqSRoopa GogineniAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

The port at Ras Kamboni receives boats from Kismayo, a port city still under the control of al-Shabab.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=06yOe4CaAz4he

A Ras Kamboni fighter retrieves water from a borehole. Residents of Ras Kamboni have dangerously little access to clean drinking water.

Mon, 10 Sep 2012 12:48:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=06yOe4CaAz4heRoopa GogineniAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

A Ras Kamboni fighter retrieves water from a borehole. Residents of Ras Kamboni have dangerously little access to clean drinking water.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=0ewCbEO1gy0IARas Kamboni soldiers drink water at one of few boreholes in the area.Mon, 10 Sep 2012 12:48:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=0ewCbEO1gy0IARoopa GogineniAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload ImagesRas Kamboni soldiers drink water at one of few boreholes in the area. http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=02Pn7jL3kO1YK

A patient waits to be seen in the newly upgraded WHO clinic, which previously served as al-Shabab's headquarters.

Mon, 10 Sep 2012 12:49:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=02Pn7jL3kO1YKRoopa GogineniAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

A patient waits to be seen in the newly upgraded WHO clinic, which previously served as al-Shabab's headquarters.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=0cRyc7A0kl8ISA patient rests after his operation. Before the clinic opened, those in need of medical care traveled to Kismayo, Mogadishu, or into Kenya for treatment.Mon, 10 Sep 2012 12:48:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=0cRyc7A0kl8ISRoopa GogineniAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload ImagesA patient rests after his operation. Before the clinic opened, those in need of medical care traveled to Kismayo, Mogadishu, or into Kenya for treatment. http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=06qS7nMg0W22X

Young boys play football in a stadium in Baidoa. Before the city was liberated in February, al-Shabab used to gather residents here to view public amputations.

Mon, 10 Sep 2012 13:31:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=06qS7nMg0W22XRoopa Gogineni Al JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

Young boys play football in a stadium in Baidoa. Before the city was liberated in February, al-Shabab used to gather residents here to view public amputations.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=01BFgWZ1cCdfi

A Ras Kamboni Brigade soldier on patrol in the seaside town of Bur Gaabo. The pro-government militia, fighting alongside the Kenyan military, now approaches Kismayo from the south.

Mon, 10 Sep 2012 13:31:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=01BFgWZ1cCdfiRoopa Gogineni Al JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

A Ras Kamboni Brigade soldier on patrol in the seaside town of Bur Gaabo. The pro-government militia, fighting alongside the Kenyan military, now approaches Kismayo from the south.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=0g6LfGB20U0Ru

Somali soldiers walk past stacks of charcoal. The UN embargo on charcoal aimed to stifle one of al-Shabab's main sources of revenue. The stockpile in Bur Gaabo is estimated to be worth several millions of dollars.

Mon, 10 Sep 2012 13:31:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=0g6LfGB20U0RuRoopa Gogineni Al JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

Somali soldiers walk past stacks of charcoal. The UN embargo on charcoal aimed to stifle one of al-Shabab's main sources of revenue. The stockpile in Bur Gaabo is estimated to be worth several millions of dollars.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=06b8baY3Vz0wBA UN embargo on charcoal exports from Somalia have left large stockpiles in Burgabo.Mon, 10 Sep 2012 12:48:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Ras-Kamboni?image_id=06b8baY3Vz0wBRoopa GogineniAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload ImagesA UN embargo on charcoal exports from Somalia have left large stockpiles in Burgabo.


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