[QODLink]
In Pictures

In Pictures: Climate change

Scientists say climate change will cause ocean levels to rise and increase the likelihood of extreme weather.
Last Modified: 26 Nov 2012 06:45


REINHARD KRAUSE/REUTERS
At its highest point, the Maldives is only about three metres above sea level. Rising sea levels, blamed on global warming, jeopardise the country's existence. Mohamed Nasheed, the Maldives' former president, was a vocal proponent of global action to fight climate change.


ARTYOM KOROTAYEV/AFP
Black carbon, a fine soot released into the atmosphere by forest fires, is a major contributor to global warming.


Getty Images/Getty Images
In nature, trees act like carbon dioxide filters, inhaling carbon dioxide and exhaling oxygen. When deforestation occurs, these natural filters disappear, leading to a rise in carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere.


LEE CELANO/REUTERS
Researchers from The Nature Conservancy, an environmental group, estimate that a one-degree Celsius rise in ocean temperature leads to a 31 per cent increase in Category 4 and 5 tropical storms. Today, the average ocean temperature is 0.5 degrees Celsius higher than in 1970.


HENNING KAISER/EPA
Power plants and other forms of energy supply are responsible for 26 per cent of the world's carbon dioxide emissions. At the moment, just 16 per cent of the world's energy comes from renewable sources, such as hydroelectricity, wind power, solar power, geothermal, or biomass.


Getty Images/Getty Images
Scientists believe that climate change will increase the likelihood of extreme droughts over the course of the next century.


Getty Images/Getty Images
Studies suggest that the increase in greenhouse emissions in the 20th century has doubled the probability of flash floods around the world.


JEFF PACHOUD/AFP/Getty Images
Transportation accounts for about 13 per cent of global carbon dioxide emissions, according to estimates from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 2007.


HO/REUTERS
Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in sea water and rising water temperatures are causing bleaching and damage to coral. This eventually kills the coral, disturbing a delicate underwater ecosystem.


ALEX GALLARDO/REUTERS
Livestock, especially animals such as cows and sheep, are a major source of methane emissions. After carbon dioxide, methane is the second-biggest contributor to climate change.


STRINGER/REUTERS
Scientists stress that climate change will not cause uniform warming throughout the world. While average temperatures will rise, weather patterns will be disrupted, causing unusually cold, wet, or dry weather in some regions. Above, a March 2012 snowstorm in Saudi Arabia.



images:
/mritems/images/2012/6/19/201261971514765127_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/6/19/201261971514905323_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/6/19/20126197151546173_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/6/19/201261971515233369_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/6/19/201261971515421677_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/6/19/201261971515624555_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/6/19/201261971515796391_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/6/19/201261971515968411_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/6/19/201261971516358526_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/6/19/201261971516577365_8.jpg;*;/mritems/images/2012/6/19/201261971516718171_8.jpg
captions:
At its highest point, the Maldives is only about three metres above sea level. Rising sea levels, blamed on global warming, jeopardise the country(***)s existence. Mohamed Nasheed, the Maldives(***) former president, was a vocal proponent of global action to fight climate change.;*;Black carbon, a fine soot released into the atmosphere by forest fires, is a major contributor to global warming.;*;In nature, trees act like carbon dioxide filters, inhaling carbon dioxide and exhaling oxygen. When deforestation occurs, these natural filters disappear, leading to a rise in carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere.;*;Researchers from The Nature Conservancy, an environmental group, estimate that a one-degree Celsius rise in ocean temperature leads to a 31 per cent increase in Category 4 and 5 tropical storms. Today, the average ocean temperature is 0.5 degrees Celsius higher than in 1970.;*;Power plants and other forms of energy supply are responsible for 26 per cent of the world\(***)s carbon dioxide emissions. At the moment, just 16 per cent of the world\(***)s energy comes from renewable sources, such as hydroelectricity, wind power, solar power, geothermal, or biomass.;*;Scientists believe that climate change will increase the likelihood of extreme droughts over the course of the next century.;*;Studies suggest that the increase in greenhouse emissions in the 20th century has doubled the probability of flash floods around the world.;*;Transportation accounts for about 13 per cent of global carbon dioxide emissions, according to estimates from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 2007.;*;Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in sea water and rising water temperatures are causing bleaching and damage to coral. This eventually kills the coral, disturbing a delicate underwater ecosystem.;*;Livestock, especially animals such as cows and sheep, are a major source of methane emissions. After carbon dioxide, methane is the second-biggest contributor to climate change.;*;Scientists stress that climate change will not cause uniform warming throughout the world. While average temperatures will rise, weather patterns will be disrupted, causing unusually cold, wet, or dry weather in some regions. Above, a March 2012 snowstorm in Saudi Arabia. Daylife ID:
1339502692121
Photographer:
REINHARD KRAUSE;*;ARTYOM KOROTAYEV;*;Getty Images;*;LEE CELANO;*;HENNING KAISER;*;Getty Images;*;Getty Images;*;JEFF PACHOUD;*;HO;*;ALEX GALLARDO;*;STRINGER
Image Source:
REUTERS;*;AFP;*;Getty Images;*;REUTERS;*;EPA;*;Getty Images;*;Getty Images;*;AFP/Getty Images;*;REUTERS;*;REUTERS;*;REUTERS
Gallery Source:
Daylife
Daylife Raw Data:
Global Warminghttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warmingen-usAl Jazeerafeedback@daylife.com10Tue, 12 Jun 2012 12:04:52 GMTTue, 19 Jun 2012 07:13:01 GMT http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=0cqRf435yWeGG

At its highest point, the Maldives, a nation composed of almost 1,200 coral islands, is only about three metres above sea level. Rising sea levels, blamed on global warming, jeopardise the country's existence. Mohamed Nasheed, the country's former president, was a vocal proponent of global action to fight climate change.

Fri, 11 Dec 2009 09:41:23 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=0cqRf435yWeGGREINHARD KRAUSEREUTERSReuters Pictures

At its highest point, the Maldives, a nation composed of almost 1,200 coral islands, is only about three metres above sea level. Rising sea levels, blamed on global warming, jeopardise the country's existence. Mohamed Nasheed, the country's former president, was a vocal proponent of global action to fight climate change.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=0cElfMr9Yf2r0

Black carbon, a fine soot released into the atmosphere by forest fires, is a major contributor to global warming.

Sun, 19 Sep 2010 14:22:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=0cElfMr9Yf2r0ARTYOM KOROTAYEVAFPGetty Images

Black carbon, a fine soot released into the atmosphere by forest fires, is a major contributor to global warming.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=03uaf3IfFj902

In nature, trees act like carbon dioxide filters, inhaling carbon dioxide and exhaling oxygen. When deforestation occurs, these natural filters disappear, leading to a rise in carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere.

Tue, 12 Jun 2012 14:08:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=03uaf3IfFj902Getty ImagesGetty ImagesAl Jazeera Upload Images

In nature, trees act like carbon dioxide filters, inhaling carbon dioxide and exhaling oxygen. When deforestation occurs, these natural filters disappear, leading to a rise in carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=03thbq0fV08tB

Researchers from The Nature Conservancy, an environmental group, estimate that a one-degree Celsius rise in ocean temperature leads to a 31 per cent increase in Category 4 and 5 tropical storms. Today, the average ocean temperature is 0.5 degrees Celsius higher than in 1970.

Mon, 02 May 2011 22:35:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=03thbq0fV08tBLEE CELANOREUTERSReuters Pictures

Researchers from The Nature Conservancy, an environmental group, estimate that a one-degree Celsius rise in ocean temperature leads to a 31 per cent increase in Category 4 and 5 tropical storms. Today, the average ocean temperature is 0.5 degrees Celsius higher than in 1970.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=0aK5gNm4KP359

Power plants and other forms of energy supply are responsible for 26 per cent of the world's carbon dioxide emissions. At the moment, just 16 per cent of the world's energy comes from renewable sources, such as hydroelectricity, wind power, solar power, geothermal, or biomass.

Mon, 06 Feb 2012 17:21:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=0aK5gNm4KP359HENNING KAISEREPAEPA Images

Power plants and other forms of energy supply are responsible for 26 per cent of the world's carbon dioxide emissions. At the moment, just 16 per cent of the world's energy comes from renewable sources, such as hydroelectricity, wind power, solar power, geothermal, or biomass.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=06zI61Eaob7us

Scientists believe that climate change will increase the likelihood of extreme droughts over the course of the next century.

Tue, 12 Jun 2012 13:40:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=06zI61Eaob7usGetty ImagesGetty ImagesAl Jazeera Upload Images

Scientists believe that climate change will increase the likelihood of extreme droughts over the course of the next century.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=04nR3kS3pI3kO

Studies suggest that the increase in greenhouse emissions in the 20th century has doubled the probability of flash floods around the world.

Tue, 12 Jun 2012 15:12:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=04nR3kS3pI3kOGetty ImagesGetty ImagesAl Jazeera Upload Images

Studies suggest that the increase in greenhouse emissions in the 20th century has doubled the probability of flash floods around the world.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=000P1lfcs1gnW

Transportation accounts for about 13 per cent of global carbon dioxide emissions, according to estimates from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 2007.

Sat, 23 Jul 2011 17:51:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=000P1lfcs1gnWJEFF PACHOUDAFP/Getty ImagesGetty Images

Transportation accounts for about 13 per cent of global carbon dioxide emissions, according to estimates from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in 2007.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=01vh9zI3NQgzE

Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in sea water and rising water temperatures are causing bleaching and damage to coral. This eventually kills the coral, disturbing a delicate underwater ecosystem.

Sun, 14 Nov 2010 14:16:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=01vh9zI3NQgzEHOREUTERSReuters Pictures

Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in sea water and rising water temperatures are causing bleaching and damage to coral. This eventually kills the coral, disturbing a delicate underwater ecosystem.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=05TCb7QgOQ6c3

Livestock, especially animals such as cows and sheep, are a major source of methane emissions. After carbon dioxide, methane is the second-biggest contributor to climate change.

Wed, 25 Apr 2012 21:39:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=05TCb7QgOQ6c3ALEX GALLARDOREUTERSReuters Pictures

Livestock, especially animals such as cows and sheep, are a major source of methane emissions. After carbon dioxide, methane is the second-biggest contributor to climate change.

http://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=0dD31VQc3n8Sx

Scientists stress that climate change will not cause uniform warming throughout the world. Instead, while average global temperatures will rise, weather patterns will be disrupted, causing unusually cold, wet, or dry weather in some regions. Above, a March 2012 snowstorm in the Saudi Arabian desert.

Sat, 03 Mar 2012 12:54:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Global-Warming?image_id=0dD31VQc3n8SxSTRINGERREUTERSReuters Pictures

Scientists stress that climate change will not cause uniform warming throughout the world. Instead, while average global temperatures will rise, weather patterns will be disrupted, causing unusually cold, wet, or dry weather in some regions. Above, a March 2012 snowstorm in the Saudi Arabian desert.



Featured on Al Jazeera
UNHCR says hundreds of people trapped in Yaloke town risk death if they are not evacuated to safety urgently.
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.