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In Pictures
In pictures: Mali after the coup
Pictures of life in Bamako as citizens begin to rebuild the country in the aftermath of last month's tumultuous events.
Last Modified: 26 Apr 2012 10:17

On the evening of March 22, junior officers in Mali's army calling themselves the "National Committee for the Re-establishment of Democracy and the Restoration of the State" took control of the state TV and announced the suspension of the constitution and immediate transfer of power to themselves. Tuareg and Islamist rebels in the north of the country then used the leadership void in the capital to embark on an offensive that saw them take three major northern towns - Gao, Timbuktu and Kidal - in three consecutive days, effectively dividing the country in two.

Although regional body ECOWAS has held mediation talks with the military junta, leading to the establishment of constitutional rule and an interim president, Bamako is reeling from the coup's aftershocks. The Malian political class is in shambles, the country is divided and thousands of northerners have fled to the capital, leaving their homes to escape the violence.

But for now, a calm prevails over Bamako as its residents gather their spirits to face the colossal task of rebuilding their beloved country.


Joe Penney/Al Jazeera
A view of southern Bamako at dusk. Though calm now, Bamako is still reeling from the effects of the crisis in the north of the country and the political impasse after the military coup.


Joe Penney/Al Jazeera
Malians rally against aggression by Tuareg and Islamist rebels in the north of the country at Modibo Keita stadium in Bamako.


Joe Penney/Al Jazeera
North Malians sing the Malian national anthem during a sit-in to call for humanitarian aid and weapons to fight Tuareg and Islamist rebels at a landmark in southern Bamako.


Joe Penney/Al Jazeera
An ethnic Songhai man from the region of Gao during a protest against Tuareg and Islamist rebels at Modibo Keita. Many northern Malians from different ethnic groups feel that Tuaregs, who form a minority in their claimed homeland, have no right to their own state.


Joe Penney/Al Jazeera
Men read newspaper headlines detailing Mali's political crises at a kiosk.


Joe Penney/Al Jazeera
A man holds up a sign that reads "The North cries, Sarkozy laughs" during a sit-in to call for humanitarian aid and weapons to fight Tuareg and Islamist rebels. Anti-French sentiment is growing in Mali because of a perceived French bias towards Tuareg rebels.


Joe Penney/Al Jazeera
Paul Djily, manager of a Malian bus company, smokes a cigarette at his company's office. He says that demand for transport from the northern regions of Gao and Timbuktu to Bamako has more than doubled since the start of hostilities there, as families flee the violence.


Joe Penney/Al Jazeera
A Malian family escaping violence in Gao arrives at the Bamako bus station with all their belongings.


Joe Penney/Al Jazeera
A security officer speaks on his cell phone while standing guard outside the military junta headquarters in Kati, 15 km from Bamako. Although they have formally relinquished power, the junta still controls the presidential palace.


Joe Penney/Al Jazeera
Mali's interim President Dioncounda Traore arrives at Bamako airport after spending two weeks in exile following the military coup d'etat. A divisive figure, Traore faces many obstacles in his bid to reunite the country.


Joe Penney/Al Jazeera
Boys run after the winner of a horse race at the Bamako racetrack. Despite Mali's multiple crises, Bamako residents busy themselves with their daily routines and make time for leisure activities.


Joe Penney/Al Jazeera
A podium decked out in the colours of Mali's flag is seen on a stadium pitch before a rally against Tuareg and Islamist rebels at a stadium in the capital Bamako. Many Bamako residents attribute the seizure of Mali's north by the rebels to a lack of strong leadership.



images:
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captions:
A view of southern Bamako at dusk. Though calm now, Bamako is still reeling from the effects of the crisis in the north of the country and the political impasse after the military coup.;*;Malians rally against aggression by Tuareg and Islamist rebels in the north of the country at Modibo Keita stadium in Bamako.;*;North Malians sing the Malian national anthem during a sit-in to call for humanitarian aid and weapons to fight Tuareg and Islamist rebels at a landmark in southern Bamako.;*;An ethnic Songhai man from the region of Gao during a protest against Tuareg and Islamist rebels at Modibo Keita. Many northern Malians from different ethnic groups feel that Tuaregs, who form a minority in their claimed homeland, have no right to their own state.;*;Men read newspaper headlines detailing Mali(***)s political crises at a kiosk.;*;A man holds up a sign that reads "The North cries, Sarkozy laughs" during a sit-in to call for humanitarian aid and weapons to fight Tuareg and Islamist rebels. Anti-French sentiment is growing in Mali because of a perceived French bias towards Tuareg rebels.;*;Paul Djily, manager of a Malian bus company, smokes a cigarette at his company(***)s office. He says that demand for transport from the northern regions of Gao and Timbuktu to Bamako has more than doubled since the start of hostilities there, as families flee the violence.;*;A Malian family escaping violence in Gao arrives at the Bamako bus station with all their belongings.;*;A security officer speaks on his cell phone while standing guard outside the military junta headquarters in Kati, 15 km from Bamako. Although they have formally relinquished power, the junta still controls the presidential palace.;*;Mali(***)s interim President Dioncounda Traore arrives at Bamako airport after spending two weeks in exile following the military coup d(***)etat. A divisive figure, Traore faces many obstacles in his bid to reunite the country.;*;Boys run after the winner of a horse race at the Bamako racetrack. Despite Mali(***)s multiple crises, Bamako residents busy themselves with their daily routines and make time for leisure activities.;*;A podium decked out in the colours of Mali(***)s flag is seen on a stadium pitch before a rally against Tuareg and Islamist rebels at a stadium in the capital Bamako. Many Bamako residents attribute the seizure of Mali(***)s north by the rebels to a lack of strong leadership. Daylife ID:
1335169694655
Photographer:
Joe Penney;*;Joe Penney;*;Joe Penney;*;Joe Penney;*;Joe Penney;*;Joe Penney;*;Joe Penney;*;Joe Penney;*;Joe Penney;*;Joe Penney;*;Joe Penney;*;Joe Penney
Image Source:
Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera;*;Al Jazeera
Gallery Source:
Daylife
Daylife Raw Data:
Joe Penney Galleryhttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Galleryen-usAl Jazeerafeedback@daylife.com10Mon, 23 Apr 2012 08:28:13 GMTMon, 23 Apr 2012 09:38:25 GMTBamako_01.jpghttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=0dCbdFFek6dX1A view of southern Bamako at dusk. Though calm now, Bamako is still reeling from the effects of the crisis in the north of the country and the political impasse after the military coup.Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=0dCbdFFek6dX1Joe PenneyAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload ImagesA view of southern Bamako at dusk. Though calm now, Bamako is still reeling from the effects of the crisis in the north of the country and the political impasse after the military coup.Bamako_01.jpgBamako_02.jpghttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=0feLfvib65e6fMalians rally against aggression by Tuareg and Islamist rebels in the north of the country at Modibo Keita stadium in Bamako.Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=0feLfvib65e6fJoe PenneyAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload ImagesMalians rally against aggression by Tuareg and Islamist rebels in the north of the country at Modibo Keita stadium in Bamako.Bamako_02.jpgBamako_03.jpghttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=00JL4x38bs18MNorth Malians sing the Malian national anthem during a sit-in to call for humanitarian aid and weapons to fight Tuareg and Islamist rebels at a landmark in southern Bamako.Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=00JL4x38bs18MJoe PenneyAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload ImagesNorth Malians sing the Malian national anthem during a sit-in to call for humanitarian aid and weapons to fight Tuareg and Islamist rebels at a landmark in southern Bamako.Bamako_03.jpgBamako_04.jpghttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=02WM3GC2O20f6

An ethnic Songhai man from the region of Gao wears a traditional hunter's hat during a protest against Tuareg and Islamist rebels at Modibo Keita. Many northern Malians from different ethnic groups feel that Tuaregs, who form a minority in their claimed homeland, have no right to their own state.

Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=02WM3GC2O20f6Joe PenneyAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

An ethnic Songhai man from the region of Gao wears a traditional hunter's hat during a protest against Tuareg and Islamist rebels at Modibo Keita. Many northern Malians from different ethnic groups feel that Tuaregs, who form a minority in their claimed homeland, have no right to their own state.

Bamako_04.jpg
Bamako_05.jpghttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=0fit6ticue5c5

Men read newspaper headlines detailing Mali's political crises at a kiosk.

Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=0fit6ticue5c5Joe PenneyAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

Men read newspaper headlines detailing Mali's political crises at a kiosk.

Bamako_05.jpg
Bamako_06.jpghttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=0ak40ak6QL2fY

A man holds up a sign that reads "The North cries, Sarkozy laughs" during a sit-in to call for humanitarian aid and weapons to fight Tuareg and Islamist rebels. Anti-French sentiment is growing in Mali because of a perceived French bias towards Tuareg rebels.

Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=0ak40ak6QL2fYJoe PenneyAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

A man holds up a sign that reads "The North cries, Sarkozy laughs" during a sit-in to call for humanitarian aid and weapons to fight Tuareg and Islamist rebels. Anti-French sentiment is growing in Mali because of a perceived French bias towards Tuareg rebels.

Bamako_06.jpg
Bamako_07.jpghttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=00KU0uS1yZ9kL

Paul Djily, manager of a Malian bus company, smokes a cigarette at his company's office. He says that demand for transport from the northern regions of Gao and Timbuktu to Bamako has more than doubled since the start of hostilities there, as families flee the violence.

Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=00KU0uS1yZ9kLJoe PenneyAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

Paul Djily, manager of a Malian bus company, smokes a cigarette at his company's office. He says that demand for transport from the northern regions of Gao and Timbuktu to Bamako has more than doubled since the start of hostilities there, as families flee the violence.

Bamako_07.jpg
Bamako_08.jpghttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=0c5PbxS8bI8cKA Malian family escaping violence in Gao arrives at the Bamako bus station with all their belongings.Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=0c5PbxS8bI8cKJoe PenneyAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload ImagesA Malian family escaping violence in Gao arrives at the Bamako bus station with all their belongings.Bamako_08.jpgBamako_10.jpghttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=01eJ7791u5dzrA security officer speaks on his cell phone while standing guard outside the military junta headquarters in Kati, 15 km from Bamako. Although they have formally relinquished power, the junta still controls the presidential palace.Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=01eJ7791u5dzrJoe PenneyAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload ImagesA security officer speaks on his cell phone while standing guard outside the military junta headquarters in Kati, 15 km from Bamako. Although they have formally relinquished power, the junta still controls the presidential palace.Bamako_10.jpgBamako_09.jpghttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=0aqa07s3viflM

Mali's interim President Dioncounda Traore arrives at Bamako airport after spending two weeks in exile following the military coup d'etat. A divisive figure, Traore faces many obstacles in his bid to reunite the country.

Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=0aqa07s3viflMJoe PenneyAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

Mali's interim President Dioncounda Traore arrives at Bamako airport after spending two weeks in exile following the military coup d'etat. A divisive figure, Traore faces many obstacles in his bid to reunite the country.

Bamako_09.jpg
Bamako_11.jpghttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=0bKxet5bGm4A1

Boys run after the winner of a horse race at the Bamako racetrack. Despite Mali's multiple crises, Bamako residents busy themselves with their daily routines and make time for leisure activities.

Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=0bKxet5bGm4A1Joe PenneyAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

Boys run after the winner of a horse race at the Bamako racetrack. Despite Mali's multiple crises, Bamako residents busy themselves with their daily routines and make time for leisure activities.

Bamako_11.jpg
Bamako_12.jpghttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=07SebFN5Jg63C

A podium decked out in the colours of Mali's flag is seen on a stadium pitch before a rally against Tuareg and Islamist rebels at a stadium in the capital Bamako. Many Bamako residents attribute the seizure of Mali's north by the rebels to a lack of strong leadership.

Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:00:00 GMThttp://aljazeera.smartgalleries.net/gallery/Joe-Penney-Gallery?image_id=07SebFN5Jg63CJoe PenneyAl JazeeraAl Jazeera Upload Images

A podium decked out in the colours of Mali's flag is seen on a stadium pitch before a rally against Tuareg and Islamist rebels at a stadium in the capital Bamako. Many Bamako residents attribute the seizure of Mali's north by the rebels to a lack of strong leadership.

Bamako_12.jpg


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