[QODLink]
Features

Tribalism: Us and them

Economic disparities are one legacy of the colonial era, but such social divides can be politicised - and militarised.
Last Modified: 23 Feb 2013 16:55

With members of tribes and ethnic communities forced from their land during colonial times in favour of other groups, resentment continues to linger around the lack of land reforms since Kenya's independence in the 1960s.

As some communities and districts were favoured by the British occupiers over others, entire regions have found themselves marginalised and under-developed, a social injustice that has yet to be fully rectified.

Deep-seated economic inequalities between regions and between ethnic groups can easily be politicised. "And what has been both ethnicised and politicised can easily be militarised," says anti-corruption activist John Githongo.

Otsieno Namwaya, from Human Rights Watch, agrees: "We are seeing mobilisation along ethnic lines, such that the election is turning out to be a competition between tribes and communities...

"We are beginning to see a devolution of violence."

This video is part of IRIN's "No Ordinary Election" series. Catch up with the whole special series here.

186

Source:
IRIN
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.