[QODLink]
Human Rights

Egyptian court sentences 37 to death

In a mass trial Cairo also hands 492 life sentences claiming accused were "demons" following Jewish scripture.

Last updated: 02 Jun 2014 11:27
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
In March relatives of 529 sentenced in a previous case cried outside the Minya courthouse after the verdict [AFP]

An Egyptian court has sentenced 37 men to death and handed life terms to 492 others, claiming the accused were "demons" who followed Jewish scripture.

The court in the city of Minya defended the verdict on Sunday.

In a statement the court justified its decision saying: "The accused came out of the depths of hell... to plunder Egypt's wealth, tyrannize its people and they killed the deputy commissioner."

The statement continued describing the men as "enemies of the nation" who used mosques to promote teachings of "their holy book, the Talmud."

The Minya court previously triggered international outrage after sentencing hundreds to death for allegedly supporting ousted President Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood.

In a trial in March the court sentenced 529 men to death for the killing of a police officer, but later upheld the ruling against 37 with the remaining jailed for life.

In April, the same court handed death penalties to 683 Muslim Brotherhood supporters including the group's supreme guide, Mohamed Badie, accusing them of murder and attempted murder of police officials.

The Egyptian military ousted former President Morsi in July last year following mass protests following his year in power.

Since military takeover security forces have launched a crackdown on Muslim Brotherhood supporters.

At least 1,400 people have been killed and thousands more have been arrested, according to Amnesty International.

229

Source:
AFP
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.
Public stripping and assault of woman and rival protests thereafter highlight Kenya's gender-relations divide.