Kuwait reforms expat deportation laws

Police must now obtain government approval to expel expatriates in move that aims to improve immigrant workers' rights.

    Kuwait reforms expat deportation laws

    Kuwaiti police will no longer be able to deport expatriates without interior ministry approval under new laws established after officers expelled thousands over the past year.

    The Kuwait Society for Human Rights (KSHR) said the move on Thursday was a "step in the right direction" to protect the rights of the emirate's 2.7 million expatriates, although it fell short of activists' calls for an end to all deportations not ordered by the courts.

    In April, last year Kuwait made a range of traffic offences punishable by deportation, including driving without a licence, a document impossible for many expats to obtain.

    Thousands of people have since been deported on the authority of a senior police officer, but in future all expulsion orders will have to be countersigned by the interior ministry undersecretary.

    "The decision is a step`1 in the right direction to improve the situation of immigrant workers who were harmed by oppressive decisions taken in violation of international rights treaties signed by Kuwait," KSHR chief Khaled al-Ajmi said.

    Expatriates make up 69 percent of Kuwait's 3.9 million population, greatly outnumbering its 1.2 million citizens.

    In April last year, Social Affairs and Labour Minister Thekra al-Rasheedi said the emirate planned to deport around 100,000 expatriates every year for the next decade to reduce the number of foreigners living in the Gulf state by one million.

    She did not say what measures she would adopt to carry out the plan.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Almost 300 people died in Mogadishu but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Japan's third-largest steelmaker has admitted it faked data on parts used in cars, planes and trains.