Namibia allege match-fix approach

A second allegation of attempted match-fixing rocks the Africa Cup of Nations.

    Namibian players, pictured in red, refused a bribe offer and immediately informed the CAF [AFP] 

    "My players were approached by a man saying he represented a syndicate and offered them money to lose the game," Muinjo told Reuters in Accra on Saturday.
     
    It follows a similar alleged approach to Reinhard Fabisch, Benin coach, before the start of the tournament by an unidentified man, purporting to represent betting interests.
     

    "The players came to me immediately to tell me and we've informed CAF of what has happened."

    John Muinjo,
    Namibia FA president

    "The players came to me immediately to tell me and we've informed CAF of what has happened," said Muinjo.
     
    "The players were offered up to $30,000 to lose the game. They were offered half in advance but told they had to be able during the game to manipulate the score on the instructions of the syndicate."
     
    Muinjo said he had immediately called a meeting with the squad, warning them of the dangers of bribery.
     
    "I'm very proud that my players came to see me straight away. I warned them about the impact accepting these sorts of offers could have on their careers," Muinjo.
     
    "They are a team who believe in fair play."
     
    Investigation underway
     
    There was no immediate official reaction from CAF on the latest controversy but officials told Reuters an investigation had been launched.
     
    Namibia have lost their opening two games at the Nations Cup only have a slim mathematical chance of reaching the quarter-finals.
     
    On Thursday, Fabisch revealed details of an approach he received last weekend ahead of Benin's opening game against Mali in Sekondi.
     
    Fabisch is to sign an official affidavit on Saturday about the match-fixing approach, which he rejected on the spot.
     
    The Benin coach said he had been approached by a man who claimed to be from a Singapore-based company.
     
    "He wanted to find out from me if there was any possibility of manipulating the match," Fabisch said.
     
    The German coach, who previously worked in Zimbabwe, South Africa and Kenya, said he then told the unidentified man he had two minutes to leave or the police would be called.
     
    The man said the company he represented claimed to be able to fix matches across Africa and planned to win money in bets on the tournament's opening goal.

    SOURCE: Agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    The woman who cleans up after 'lonely deaths' in Japan

    The woman who cleans up after 'lonely deaths' in Japan

    When somebody dies lonely and alone, Miyu Kojima steps in to clean their home and organise the mementos of their life.

    Putin and the 'triumph of Christianity' in Russia

    Putin and the 'triumph of Christianity' in Russia

    The rise of the Orthodox Church in Russia appears unstoppable, write filmmakers Glen Ellis and Viktoryia Kolchyna who went to investigate the close ties between the church and Putin.

    The chill effect: Is India's media running scared?

    The chill effect: Is India's media running scared?

    Much of India's media spurns a scoop about the son of PM Modi's right-hand man. Plus, NFL as platform for race politics.